The Epigenesis of Mind: Essays on Biology and Cognition

By Susan G. Carey; Rochel G. Gelman | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

This book has a complex epigenesis, starting with a decision by Elizabeth Spelke and Rochel Gelman to convene a workshop to discuss what it could mean to say there are structural constraints on cognitive development. In June of 1984 (thanks to support from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation and the Program in Cognitive Science at the University of Pennsylvania) about 20 scholars with different theoretical persuasions and areas of expertise, including Computer Science, Biology, Ethology, Philosophy and Psychology, gathered at Penn to talk about the idea that knowledge can be innate and yet develop. These discussions provided the background material for the working group on Structural Constraints on Cognitive Development that spent the next year at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences in Stanford, California. Ann Brown, Frank Keil, and the two of us met every Monday morning to study relevant literatures--including ones on ethology and animal psychology--and evolve our positions. Randy Gallistel, also at the Center, served as a sounding board for our forays into psychobiological areas. We also held a seminar for other interested Center Fellows and scholars at nearby institutions. We thank Eve Clark, John Flavell, and Ellen Markman (at Stanford), Kurt van Lehn (at Xerox Parc), Mary Kistler (at Ames-NASA), and Tom Bever, Jacqueline Goodnow, Arthur Parmelee, and Arnold Sameroff (all Center Fellows) for their contributions to our exploration of the role of domain-specific and domain-general constraints on cognitive development.

The Alfred P. Sloan Foundation joined the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences in their support of our group efforts; it also provided full or partial funding for Randy Gallistel, Rochel Gelman, and Frank Keil; Ann Brown and Susan Carey received funding from the Spencer Foundation. Further contributions to Gelman's support were provided by an NICHHD Senior Postdoctoral Fellowship; The Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, The Exxon Foundation and the MacArthur Foundation all made contributions to Keil's stipend.

Finally, a special note of thanks to the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, and Gardner Lindzey in particular, for encouraging and facilitating the gathering of our study group and supporting our work during our stay in an extraordinary fashion.

Susan Carey Rochel Gelman

-xi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Epigenesis of Mind: Essays on Biology and Cognition
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 342

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.