Race Discrimination in Public Higher Education: Interpreting Federal Civil Rights Enforcement, 1964-1996

By John B. Williams | Go to book overview

argument that proved successful in the Hopwood case -- that race-based admissions policies contradict the Supreme Court's Adarand Constructors Inc v. Pena ( 1995).


REFERENCES

Ayres Q. Whitfield. 1984. "Racial Desegregation in Higher Education." In Implementation of Civil Rights Policy, edited by Charles S. Bullock and Charles M. Lamb, pp. 118-147. Monterey, Calif.: Brooks/Cole.

Bakke v. Regents of the University of California, 438 U.S. 265 ( 1998).

Birnbaum Robert. 1988. How Colleges Work. San Francisco, Calif.: Jossey- Bass.

Brown v. Board of Education, 347 U.S. 483 ( 1954).

Ellison Ralph. 1966. Shadow and Act. New York: New American Library.

Healy Patrick. 1997b. "Lawsuit Attacks Race-Based Policies in University System of Georgia." Chronicle of Higher Education, March 4, 1997, p. A25.

Lindblom Charles. 1980. The Policymaking Process. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall.

Mazmanian Daniel A. and Sabatier Paul A. 1983. Implementation of Public Policy. Glenview, Ill.: Scott, Foresman.

McPherson Michael and Schapiro Morton. 1991. Keeping College Affordable. Washington, D.C.: Brookings Institution.

Schmidt Peter. 1997. "Rancor and Confusion Greet Change in South Carolina Budgeting." Chronicle of Higher Education, April 4, 1997, p. A26.

St. Edward P. John 1989. "The Influence of Student Aid on Persistence." Journal of Student Financial Aid, 19 ( 1989): 52-68.

St. Edward P. John, Paulsen Michael B., and Starkey Johnny B. 1996. "The Nexus Between College Choice and Persistence." Research in Higher Education, 37 ( 1996): 175-220.

Texas v. Hopwood, 78 F. 3rd 932 ( 1996).

United States v. Fordice, 112 S. Ct. 2727 ( 1992).

U.S. General Accounting Office. 1996. Higher Education Tuition Increasing Faster Than Household Income and Public Colleges' Costs. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office.

Woodson, et al. v. Georgia Board of Regents, Unnumbered Civil Action, Plaintiff Brief, February 26, 1997.

-185-

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