White Wealth and Black Poverty: American Investments in Southern Africa

By Barbara C. Rogers | Go to book overview

ular increase will be granted, hours of work will be long and employment conditions in general will be far worse than those for workers covered by an industrial council."69 In border areas, African wages have been estimated at 64 percent below those paid in the major urban areas 70 -where, as we indicated in Chapter 2, they are well below minimum subsistence levels.

It is worth noting that apart from the theoretical discretion allowed to "homeland governments" to enforce or waive minimum wages for their people, all major aspects of investment in the "homelands" are firmly in the hands of the South African central government. Under current legislation, all foreign investment or the much debated "aid" to the Bantustans must be negotiated with the South African government, even if the "homeland governments" have played a role in attracting the capital. Far from relaxing this control, which promoters of investment in the "homelands" suggest is imminent, it is being consolidated. In a press interview at the end of 1972, the prime minister indicated that "homeland governments" would not be allowed to raise capital independently, even if they became nominally "independent." 71 One of the first moves of the new director of Homeland Affairs, Mr. C.J. Grobler, appointed at the end of 1973, was to announce that "homeland governments" would have to channel requests even for outside advice or the employment of consultants at their own expense, through his office. 72

There is an increasing volume of support within the United States for promoting investment in the "homelands." However, in a quiet hearing with reference to the conditions prevailing in any such investment, a spokesman for the U.S. Department of Labor commented: "I am certain that if we were asked by firms if they should develop industry in those areas, we would probably recommend against it."73


NOTES
1.
Quoted in the Washington Post, February 11, 1973.
2.
See, for example, Barbara Rogers, South Africa Bantustans ( London: International Defence and Aid Fund for Southern Africa, 1976). 1972).
3.
Beaumont Commission, 1916; see G. M. Carter, T. Karis, and N. M. Stultz , South Africa's Transkei: The Politics of Domestic Colonialism (Evanson: Northwestern University Press, 1967), p. 63.

-19-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
White Wealth and Black Poverty: American Investments in Southern Africa
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction xiii
  • Chapter 1 Separate Development and White Supremacy 3
  • Notes 19
  • Chapter 2 Wealth and Poverty in South Africa 23
  • Notes 83
  • Chapter 3 the Special Role of Foreign Investment in South Africa's Economy 93
  • Chapter 4 the Role of United States Investment in South Africa 123
  • Notes 162
  • Chapter 5 Namibia 170
  • Notes 211
  • Chapter 6 Southern Rhodesia 217
  • Notes 227
  • Chapter 7 Former Portuguese Colonies 230
  • Notes 247
  • Chapter 8 the Prospect of International Boycotts 251
  • Notes 264
  • Chapter 9 Summary 267
  • Chapter 10 Conclusions 280
  • Appendix I U.S. Corporations with Operations in South Africa 289
  • Appendix II Companies with Operations in Namibia Linked with South African Investments 297
  • Appendix III U.S. Corporations with Interests in Southern Rhodesia 299
  • Appendix IV Universal Declaration of Human Rights 306
  • Index 311
  • About the Author 333
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 338

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.