Labour Governments and Private Industry: The Experience of 1945-1951

By H. Mercer; N. Rollings et al. | Go to book overview

the Shipbuilding Committee and the Shipbuilding Advisory Committee. If the various criticisms cited in the conclusion of this essay concerning industrial self government and the business in government system are correct it also seems incumbent to point out that such a system was of an earlier origin. One of the most interesting aspects of the industry was the longevity of the personnel. A substantial number of those individuals who were responsible for control during and after the Second World War had been involved in the business in government system of the First World War and the self government and rationalisation process of the inter-war period. Whether this represented tapping the best available expertise with respect to the industry or was an encouragement, in Balogh's phrase, to 'sluggish vegetation' is an open question but it does seem unlikely that men with the clear political stamp of Cunningham and Lithgow would ever be sympathetic to state intervention, particularly from a Labour government.

The appendix provides details of the pre-war and wartime careers of the membership of the Shipbuilding Committee.


The Shipbuilding Committee, 1944-1945
Chairman
Sir Cyril Hurcomb Ministry of Shipping, 1915-18; Permanent
Secretary, Ministry of Transport, 1927-37;
Director General, Ministry of Shipping,
1939-41 and Director General, Ministry of
War Transport, 1941-7.
Representing the First Lord of the Admiralty
Sir James Lithgow Chairman of Lithgow's Group; Director of
Shipbuilding Production, 1917; President
of the Clyde Shipbuilders Association,
1908; the Shipbuilder's Employers'
Federation, 1922; The British Employers'
Federation, 1924 and the Federation of
British Industries, 1930-2. Member of the
Board of the Admiralty and Controller of
Merchant Shipbuilding and Repairs,
1940-6.
E. A. Seal Board of the Admiralty since 1925; PPS to
the First Lord, 1938-40; PPS to the Prime
Minister, 1940-1; Deputy Secretary of the
Admiralty, 1941-3 and Under Secretary of
the Admiralty, 1943-5.

-204-

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Labour Governments and Private Industry: The Experience of 1945-1951
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Notes on the Contributors vi
  • Preface vii
  • One: Introduction 1
  • Part One the Policies 13
  • Appendix 2.2 Edited Version of Gen343/4 'Revised Draft of the Bill', 6 February 1951 32
  • Notes 33
  • Three: Productivity Policy 37
  • Four Anti-Monopoly Policy 55
  • Conclusions 69
  • Notes 70
  • Five: Private Industrial Investment 74
  • Six Whatever Happened to the British Warfare State? the Ministry of Supply, 1945-1951 91
  • Notes 113
  • Seven: Taxation Policy 117
  • Part Two the Sectors 135
  • Eight the Cotton Industry: A Middle Way Between Nationalisation and Self-Government? 137
  • Notes 160
  • Nine: The Motor Car Industry 162
  • Ten the Shipbuilding Industry1 186
  • Appendix 10.1 204
  • Appendix 10.1 208
  • Eleven: The Film Industry 212
  • Index 237
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