The Ancient Slavs: Settlement and Society

By Martin Gojda | Go to book overview

1
The current state of settlement archaeology of the Slavs

The terms 'Slavic archaeology' or 'the archaeology of the (ancient) Slavs' were introduced into historical investigation around the turn of the nineteenth century. Until now it has been traditionally used as a designation for the discipline which is engaged in prospecting, collecting, elaborating, analysing and interpreting the remains of early medieval material culture derived from the vast territory which, since the Migration period, has been settled by Slavic ethnic groups. Although critical opinions on the validity of these terms occur sometimes in discussions or in journals it seems probable that in the future no changes will appear in this respect (in favour of, for instance, 'early medieval archaeology' or 'historical archaeology'). Incidentally, it is not an exclusively Eastern-European habit to label single archaeological disciplines after the nations which used to live in a territory during a certain period. Even in Britain the term 'Anglo-Saxon archaeology' or 'the archaeology of Anglo-Saxon England' has been frequently preferred over 'early medieval archaeology'. At this moment it should be stressed that the archaeology of the Slavs coincides, as regards the chronology, with the Anglo-Saxon period in England ( C6-11 AD).

Slavic archaeology is traditionally considered a part of Slavic studies, a comprehensive scientific branch which, with the aid of many subdisciplines, studies the history and culture of Slavic nations. Stimulation to its development was given by the rise of the Enlightenment during the Age of Reason in eighteenth- century Europe. Through the effort of the so-called encyclopaedists, history became a real scientific discipline which followed

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Upgrade your membership to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Ancient Slavs: Settlement and Society
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved in your active project from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 108

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Upgrade your membership to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.