Denmark before the Vikings

By Glyn Daniel; Ole Klindt-Jensen | Go to book overview

Introduction

A HUNDRED AND FIFTY years ago on the 22nd of May 1807, by the command of Christian VII, King of Denmark, the Royal Commission for the Preservation of Antiquities was founded in Copenhagen. Its object was the preservation of ancient monuments and the collection of national antiquities; and in 1816 a young man, Christian J. Thomsen, was appointed as its secretary. With energy and imagination Thomsen created from the finds which poured into the Commission the nucleus of the Royal Museum for Nordic Antiquities, from which sprang the present National Museum of Copenhagen. Known colloquially as the Old Nordic Museum, with lecture tours conducted by the curator himself, it soon be, came one of the most popular attractions of Copenhagen. Thomsen lectured brilliantly about the antiquities in the museum and the prehistory they represented; linking past with present, he would place a heavy gold ring round the neck of a child and make prehistory live in the minds of his audience.

An acute observer, Thomsen was the first scholar to distinguish the three ages of prehistory, the Stone, Bronze and Iron Ages. Many years before he published his conclusions, he had arranged the exhibition of antiquities in the Old Nordic Museum according to this sequence. The system, which for some time was the subject of dispute, was arrived at by observing different antiquities repeatedly found in association with each other.

The second great personality of Danish archaeology was J. J. A. Worsaae, a man of different temperament but no less enthusiasm. He became aware of the importance of looking at the objects in their natural surroundings and travelled about the countryside studying and excavating the visible remains of

-11-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Denmark before the Vikings
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 5
  • Illustrations 6
  • Foreword 9
  • Introduction 11
  • Chapter I - The Palaeolithic 14
  • Chapter II - The Mesolithic 20
  • Chapter III - The Neolithic 34
  • Chapter IV - The Bronze Age 58
  • Chapter V - The Pre-Roman Iron Age 81
  • Chapter VI - The Roman Iron Age 101
  • Chapter VII - The Dark Age 119
  • Chapter VIII - The Prehistoric Landscape 132
  • Chapter IX - Danefæ, Excavations and Collections 139
  • Bibliography 144
  • The Plates 147
  • Notes on the Plates 197
  • Index 205
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 214

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.