Denmark before the Vikings

By Glyn Daniel; Ole Klindt-Jensen | Go to book overview

CHAPTER IV
The Bronze Age

ALTHOUGH THERE IS NO BASIC difference between the Late Neolithic and the Early Bronze Age, the introduction of the art of bronze-casting was epoch making. In this period the social structure of the community stands out with a greater clarity than ever before. It is astonishing that craftsmen, with no tradition in the arts of the metalworker and with no local sources either of copper or tin, should have acquired in such a very short time a skill comparable with that of their fellow-craftsmen in countries more richly endowed with the raw materials of their art. It is even more astonishing that the quality of the workmanship and decoration of the Scandinavian bronze-smith is often at least as high as that found in any other European country. Opportunities for such a demon, stration of the craftsman's skill could only occur in conjunction with the acquisition of wealth based on active trade. Whether or not the smiths actually learnt their trade outside the country, we do not know for certain; but it is clear that without direct training they would not have been able to master their new and difficult art. The trade which supported their art must have been based on efficient transport, on roomy boats and wagons, or at least on pack-horses, and we must consider these factors in conjunction with the art of the bronze-smith.

The raw materials of the bronze-smith's craft had to be imported as ingots over great distances. Copper was mined in many parts of Western and Central Europe but tin was a rarer commodity, mined in only a few places in Europe in the pre- historic era. The best-known tin-mining area in Western Europe in this period was Cornwall and we know that in Roman times Cornish tin was imported into the Mediterranean area along the rivers of France.

-58-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Denmark before the Vikings
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 5
  • Illustrations 6
  • Foreword 9
  • Introduction 11
  • Chapter I - The Palaeolithic 14
  • Chapter II - The Mesolithic 20
  • Chapter III - The Neolithic 34
  • Chapter IV - The Bronze Age 58
  • Chapter V - The Pre-Roman Iron Age 81
  • Chapter VI - The Roman Iron Age 101
  • Chapter VII - The Dark Age 119
  • Chapter VIII - The Prehistoric Landscape 132
  • Chapter IX - Danefæ, Excavations and Collections 139
  • Bibliography 144
  • The Plates 147
  • Notes on the Plates 197
  • Index 205
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 214

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.