The Colloquy of Montbeliard: Religion and Politics in the Sixteenth Century

By Jill P. Raitt | Go to book overview

INTRODUCTION

On January 14, 1586, a spy for the English crown sat down to write his report. From Strasbourg Dr. Lobetius wrote to Walsingham, Queen Elizabeth's secretary of state, to let him know how Elizabeth's efforts to form a Protestant League were proceeding.

You wish to know my opinion concerning what one may expect of the Protestant princes in Germany with regard to the common good and to maintain the common cause against their adversaries. I hope I will have occasion to tell you something more positive than I have been able to tell you heretofore. But to tell you the truth, their reactions are cold and very difficult to warm up, no matter how hard one tries. 1

Lobetius remarked on the reasons for the resistance of the German princes, namely their laziness and stinginess. He wrote that the prince of Denmark was more cooperative and that some German princes were beginning to open their eyes lest they be surprised with their eyes closed. 2 It is in this context that Lobetius informed Walsingham of the activities of the agents sent by Henry of Navarre for the same purpose, that is, to raise German Protestant support for the Huguenots. One of those agents was the baron de Clervant, who passed through Strasbourg having already visited the prince of Anhalt and the landgrave of Hesse. Hesse was particularly warm and open to the idea of a Protestant League. Clervant was now bound for Württemburg to obtain the support of Duke Ludwig for the same cause. Lobetius extolled the diligence of the agents, who could not be blamed for the lack of response of some of the German princes. After commenting on the need for deep piety and devotion to stir the princes, Lobetius said that without such divinely inspired piety, all their efforts would be in vain. On the other hand, reported the spy, the pope continues his plans boldly to extend his power over all the princes. Among other things that the pope has at heart is the destruction of the city of Geneva, for which he will employ the duke of Savoy. Spanish troops also threaten Geneva, which looks to Bern for protection. Lobetius then turned to the affairs of the Holy Roman Empire and to the next meeting called by the emperor at which both religions of the empire would be represented. 3 The emperor, opposed to all troop levees, was not pleased when he heard about the letter that Queen Elizabeth had written to Duke Casimir of the Palatinate, who was gathering troops in support of Henry of Navarre, leader of the Huguenots. Meanwhile, wrote Lobetius, Gaspar de Schomberg had been in Strasbourg and also Nancy and Metz and other places spying on the followers of Henry of Navarre in order to oppose their plans.

-3-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Colloquy of Montbeliard: Religion and Politics in the Sixteenth Century
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments v
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Abbreviations xiii
  • Introduction 3
  • Notes 10
  • 1 - Ancient Liberties and Evangelical Reform 11
  • Notes 32
  • 2 - The Political Background 45
  • Notes 60
  • 3 - The Lord's Supper 73
  • Notes 100
  • 4 - The Person of Christ 110
  • Notes 126
  • 5 - Images, Baptism, and Predestination 134
  • 6 - Aftermath (1): Polemics and Politics 160
  • Notes 176
  • 7 - Aftermath (2): The Larger Scene 187
  • Notes 192
  • Appendix 1 Appendix: in Which Is Taught, What Was Done, Regarding the Communication and Protest of the French Exiles After the Colloquy of Montbéliard 197
  • Notes 201
  • Appendix 2 - Instrument 203
  • Appendix 3 207
  • Note 210
  • Bibliography of Works Cited 211
  • Index 221
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 228

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.