The Colloquy of Montbeliard: Religion and Politics in the Sixteenth Century

By Jill P. Raitt | Go to book overview

Notes
1.
Jill Raitt, "The Emperor and the Exiles: The Clash of Religion and Politics in the Sixteenth Century," Church History 52 ( June 1983): 145-56.
3.
Raitt, "The Elector John Casimir,"117-45.
4.
For an idea of the rumors in Paris on this point, see René de Lucinge, Lettres sur les debuts de la Ligue ( 1585), ed. Alain Dufour ( Geneva: Librairie Droz, 1964) [ Lucinge was Charles Emmanuel's ambassador to the court of France], 269: "Ilz tiennent qu'il vient aux huguenotz douze mille reistres et six cents harquebusiers françoys qui les attendent à Mombelliard pour leur fayre escorte enFrance." But see the letters to Henry III ( January 4, 1586) and to Villeroy, Henry's secretary of state ( January 6, 1586), from Fleury, Henry's ambassador to Savoy. Fleury assured Villeroy that while there were indeed troops in Montbéliard, they were no more than 100 or 120. Fleury also calmed fears about the immediate arrival of the "reistres," or cavalry, from Germany (BN 500 Colb.' 427, fas. 399-401).
5.
Girolamo Ragazzoni, Eveque de Bergame, Nonce en France: Correspondance de sa Nonciature 1583-1586 [hereafter Ragazzoni], ed. Pierre S. J. Blet ( Rome: Gregorian University Press, 1962) 137. The instructions given by the cardinal of Como, secretary to Gregory XIII, include a section on the pope's preference for war over peace in France: "In evento che V.S. habbi mai a venir a termini di persuadere il Re a pace o a guerra con li suoi ribelli, come facilmente potrà occorrere più d'una volta, per l'inconstantia et volubilità de le cose di la, avvertirà d'inclinar sempre più a la guerra ché a la pace, perché con li nimici di Dio non si doverebbe mai tener pace, et maggiormente poiche si è veduto con la esperienza di tanti anni, et massime ultimamente, che il Re ha sempre più guadagnato con la guerra che con la pace." See also the introductory section: "Le Nonce Entre ie Roi et la Ligue,"52-64. Unfortunately for this study, Blet frequently saw fit to omit parts of Ragazzoni's letters that refer to the Huguenots and to replace the text with brief and unsatisfying summaries. See p. xi, where Blet says that he has reproduced only "important" texts. See also the fine book by De Lamar Jensen, Diplomacy and Dogmatism: Bernardo de Mendoza and the French Catholic League ( Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1964), esp. 29-72.
6.
Jensen, Diplomacy and Dogmatism, 70: "The principal terms of the treaty were the following:
"(1) All previous edicts of pacification were superceded.
"(2) The practice of any other religion than the Roman Catholic was forbidden in France.
"(3) All ministers of any other religion should leave the kingdom within one month.
"(4) Heretics were not allowed to hold any public office.
"(5) Within six months all subjects of the king must make profession of the Catholic religion or leave the realm.
"(6) The chambres mi-parties were to be abolished.
"(7) Surrender of the fortified places conceded to the Huguenots in the Peace of Monsieur was demanded."
7.
Ragazzoni, no 163, p. 403: Ragazzoni to the cardinal of Como (secretary of Gregory XIII), [ Paris, April 18, 1585]: "trovandosi il Re Chr. mo . . . abbandonata da

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The Colloquy of Montbeliard: Religion and Politics in the Sixteenth Century
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments v
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Abbreviations xiii
  • Introduction 3
  • Notes 10
  • 1 - Ancient Liberties and Evangelical Reform 11
  • Notes 32
  • 2 - The Political Background 45
  • Notes 60
  • 3 - The Lord's Supper 73
  • Notes 100
  • 4 - The Person of Christ 110
  • Notes 126
  • 5 - Images, Baptism, and Predestination 134
  • 6 - Aftermath (1): Polemics and Politics 160
  • Notes 176
  • 7 - Aftermath (2): The Larger Scene 187
  • Notes 192
  • Appendix 1 Appendix: in Which Is Taught, What Was Done, Regarding the Communication and Protest of the French Exiles After the Colloquy of Montbéliard 197
  • Notes 201
  • Appendix 2 - Instrument 203
  • Appendix 3 207
  • Note 210
  • Bibliography of Works Cited 211
  • Index 221
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