The Colloquy of Montbeliard: Religion and Politics in the Sixteenth Century

By Jill P. Raitt | Go to book overview

3
The Lord's Supper

The controversy over the Lord's Supper was central to the Colloquy of Montbéliard; in fact, it was the only topic that the Swiss delegation had expected to discuss, according to Beza's report. This position is borne out by Clervant's remarks to Andreae that the French church thought that the Lord's Supper was the only problem between Lutherans and Reformed. 1

The setting of the colloquy is described by Andreae in his Acta. The hall was filled with "a great number of French exiles" and was presided over by Count Frederick. Two tables had been set a little apart from each other. At the first table sat Frederick and Hector Vogelmann, the ecclesiastical superintendent of Montbéliard, with the Württemberg team: theologians Jacob Andreae and Lucas Osiander and the political representatives Johann Wolfgang von Anweil and Frederick Schütz. The Swiss collocutors sat at the second table: theologians Theodore Beza and Anthony de La Faye from Geneva, Abraham Musculus and Pierre Hubner from Bern, and Claude Albery from Lausanne, and political representatives Antoine Maris from Geneva and Samuel Mayer from Bern. No remark was made by either party about the place of Count Frederick among the German theologians. Admitted as hearers were the Montbéliard ministers of the French church, Richard Dinot and Samuel Cucuel, along with those French refugees who could follow the Latin discourses. 2

In his welcoming address, the ecclesiastical superintendent of Montbliard, Hector Vogelmann, set the tone of the colloquy. He explained that the French nobles, refugees from the French wars of religion, had often asked for such a meeting concerning some articles of religion and the use of the French language in the liturgy. Out of compassion, Prince Frederick had forwarded their petition to Duke Ludwig of Württemberg, who responded by sending his theologians and several politicians to participate in the colloquy. 3 As he closed his address, Vogelmann invited Beza to say whatever he had most on his mind.

As Andreae reported it, Beza admitted that the colloquy had been called for the sake of the French exiles living in Montbéliard. Beza then requested that everything be taken down in writing to assure careful speech and fair play. He agreed to the format suggested by Andreae, that is, that written theses should serve as the basis of discussion. Beza also agreed that the theses should be confirmed only from the Word of God, after which the dogma

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The Colloquy of Montbeliard: Religion and Politics in the Sixteenth Century
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments v
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Abbreviations xiii
  • Introduction 3
  • Notes 10
  • 1 - Ancient Liberties and Evangelical Reform 11
  • Notes 32
  • 2 - The Political Background 45
  • Notes 60
  • 3 - The Lord's Supper 73
  • Notes 100
  • 4 - The Person of Christ 110
  • Notes 126
  • 5 - Images, Baptism, and Predestination 134
  • 6 - Aftermath (1): Polemics and Politics 160
  • Notes 176
  • 7 - Aftermath (2): The Larger Scene 187
  • Notes 192
  • Appendix 1 Appendix: in Which Is Taught, What Was Done, Regarding the Communication and Protest of the French Exiles After the Colloquy of Montbéliard 197
  • Notes 201
  • Appendix 2 - Instrument 203
  • Appendix 3 207
  • Note 210
  • Bibliography of Works Cited 211
  • Index 221
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