The Colloquy of Montbeliard: Religion and Politics in the Sixteenth Century

By Jill P. Raitt | Go to book overview

flesh of Christ could be present in any way other than locally and circumscriptively. This is due to Beza's inability to rise above purely human sense perception and reason. This is also the basis for his assertion that God cannot effect another kind of real presence that is heavenly, sacramental, and to be believed rather than understood. Andreae then met Beza on his own ground and accused him of falsely applying the analogia fidei. The Creed does not present the birth, passion, death, resurrection, and ascension of a mere man, but of the Logos incarnate so that the body of Christ is a deified body. Such a body, argued Andreae, differs from an animate body as much as an animate body differs from an inanimate body.

There are two problems here. Andreae would not clarify what he meant by a sacramental presence beyond asserting that God can give spiritual gifts through physical means. Andreae would not investigate the relation of sign and signified, apparently because that would seem to yield something to Beza. But he did concede that the body and blood presented with the bread and wine are spiritual gifts. Second, Andreae did not answer the charge that if Christ's body is deified, it ceases to be a human body.

Andreae's discussion of the "deified body" led to consideration of God's omnipotence and what Andreae considered to be Beza's "blasphemous" denial of it. In this context, however, Andreae insisted that what God's omnipotence makes present is not the human body of Christ as it is localized and absent but that body of Christ made present mystically in a mode beyond human comprehension.

Here, once again, Andreae and Beza might have worked toward agreement if their opposition had not been so bitter. For the mode of presence is sacramental, and therefore both mystical and relational. The difference between them is that while the Lutherans said that Christ is mystically present to the congregation on earth, Beza said that the congregation of the faithful is lifted to heaven to be mystically united with Christ.

In the last two pages of this section of the Epitome, Andreae summoned Beza before Christ's tribunal on the last day to answer for his blasphemies. Andreae also insisted that there can be no peace and no agreement, not even a truce, between them since Beza corrupted true doctrine and led souls astray. Beza must not be believed when he wrote that the Lutherans and Calvinists agree on more points than those on which they disagree. There is no agreement at all on any point with regard to the Lord's Supper, insisted Andreae, who turned to the next section of the colloquy, the person of Christ.


Notes
1.
See ch. 2, p. 49.
2.
Armand Lods, "Les Actes du Colloque de Montbéliard (1586): Une polémique entre Théodore de Bèze et Jacque Andreae,"Mélanges de la Société de Thistoire du Protestantisme Français, Bulletin Historique et Littéraire, 46 ( 1897): 197. There is no further information about those who or how many attended the colloquy

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The Colloquy of Montbeliard: Religion and Politics in the Sixteenth Century
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments v
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Abbreviations xiii
  • Introduction 3
  • Notes 10
  • 1 - Ancient Liberties and Evangelical Reform 11
  • Notes 32
  • 2 - The Political Background 45
  • Notes 60
  • 3 - The Lord's Supper 73
  • Notes 100
  • 4 - The Person of Christ 110
  • Notes 126
  • 5 - Images, Baptism, and Predestination 134
  • 6 - Aftermath (1): Polemics and Politics 160
  • Notes 176
  • 7 - Aftermath (2): The Larger Scene 187
  • Notes 192
  • Appendix 1 Appendix: in Which Is Taught, What Was Done, Regarding the Communication and Protest of the French Exiles After the Colloquy of Montbéliard 197
  • Notes 201
  • Appendix 2 - Instrument 203
  • Appendix 3 207
  • Note 210
  • Bibliography of Works Cited 211
  • Index 221
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