The Colloquy of Montbeliard: Religion and Politics in the Sixteenth Century

By Jill P. Raitt | Go to book overview

5
Images, Baptism, and Predestination

Late in the morning of March 26, at the conclusion of the long discussion of the person of Christ, Andreae asked whether Beza had anything further he wished to raise on the subject before they moved on to the topic of predestination. Beza took the opportunity to repeat that he and his colleagues had no wish to extend the colloquy to subjects they had not expected to discuss and for which they were not prepared. Beza said that to begin a discussion of predestination would be to enter into a profound abyss. It was a subject, he argued, that required preparation on the part of the collocutors and the audience. Beza also urged that he and his companions be allowed to leave so they could return home in time to prepare for Easter. He was willing to explain the doctrine of predestination to Frederick in private, but he did not foresee disagreement on the subject in any case. 1 When Andreae insisted that the Württemberg theses be read aloud, Beza protested that the audience might incorrectly suppose that the Reformed theology was fairly presented by the antitheses. To forestall such an impression, Beza agreed that the Reformed team would read the Württemberg theses on predestination and respond to them. 2

When the collocutors met that afternoon in the presence of Frederick and the persevering audience, Beza addressed them, saying that he and his colleagues wished nothing so much as a resolution of the controversies between the churches. They had tried to come to such a resolution and thereby to satisfy Frederick's "holy" request. Now the Reformed team was asked to discuss predestination, which, said Beza, was not a matter of an hour or even days or months. Beza therefore presented a written petition to Frederick asking that the colloquy conclude. The petition reminded Frederick that the Swiss theologians had been invited to discuss the Lord's Supper and the person of Christ. Furthermore, the councils of Bern and Geneva had not authorized their delegates to enter into other topics or to take the additional time necessary to discuss predestination. Besides, argued Beza, predestination should be discussed by theologians before trained students, not in the presence of those unable to grasp the arguments. If Frederick wanted a response to the Württemberg theses on predestination, Beza and his colleagues would be happy to take them home for discussion by their churches and send Frederick their opinions. Beza pleaded that, the colloquy concluded, each

-134-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Colloquy of Montbeliard: Religion and Politics in the Sixteenth Century
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments v
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Abbreviations xiii
  • Introduction 3
  • Notes 10
  • 1 - Ancient Liberties and Evangelical Reform 11
  • Notes 32
  • 2 - The Political Background 45
  • Notes 60
  • 3 - The Lord's Supper 73
  • Notes 100
  • 4 - The Person of Christ 110
  • Notes 126
  • 5 - Images, Baptism, and Predestination 134
  • 6 - Aftermath (1): Polemics and Politics 160
  • Notes 176
  • 7 - Aftermath (2): The Larger Scene 187
  • Notes 192
  • Appendix 1 Appendix: in Which Is Taught, What Was Done, Regarding the Communication and Protest of the French Exiles After the Colloquy of Montbéliard 197
  • Notes 201
  • Appendix 2 - Instrument 203
  • Appendix 3 207
  • Note 210
  • Bibliography of Works Cited 211
  • Index 221
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 228

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.