The Colloquy of Montbeliard: Religion and Politics in the Sixteenth Century

By Jill P. Raitt | Go to book overview

were charged with religion in Montbéliard. When they had duly considered the problem, they must give their advice on how best to end this growing and dangerous practice. 103 The tone of Johann Frederick's response lacked the anger of his father's orders. But then, Johann Frederick had been born and raised in Stuttgart. Montbéliard was a small, almost foreign county. He need not deal directly with its problems but could leave to agents and advisers the religious nonconformity of Montbéliard.

It was only in 1634 that Montbéliard became Lutheran even though, according to P. Pfister, a native of Montbéliard studying in Geneva in 1873, the people of Montbéliard never forgot their Reformed origins and the long struggle against the efforts of their rulers to impose the Invariata form of the Augsburg Confession. 104


Notes
1.
See n. 12.
2.
AN-K 2187: "Itaque si quae sunt ab utraque parte annotata, nolumus ea ullam vim et authenticam autoritatem protocolli habere."
3.
Ludwig Lavater à Bèze, Zurich, 19/29 Janvier, 1586. I have a transcription from the Musée de la Réformation, Geneva. The original autograph is in Ms. B-Gotha (cod. chart A. 905, f. 142: "notari adhibeantur qui omnia excipiant, ne Jacobo postea tergiversandi sit locus." There is a difficulty here because the Schonberg letter did not appear until August 1586.
4.
See chap. 1, n. 2: "Haec acta candide et bona fide consignata, vanissimos de hoc Colloquio sparsos rumores, imprimis vero Epistolam quandam, vanitatibus & calumijs refertam, & typis excusam abundè refutabunt."
5.
HAS A63, Bü 64.
6.
Ibid.
7.
Ibid.: "Dieweil uns je lenger je mehr anlanget, auch allerhand Schreiben des Bezae und seines gleichen Calvinisten uns zukommen, dass sie von dem zu Mumpelgarten gehalten Colloquio ungleich und der Warheit ungemeß berichten, iren Glimpf darinnen zu suchen; und abervil guthertzige, auch fürneme Personen gern ein gewissen satten Grund hetten, was im Colloquio zu Mumpelgarten gehandelt worden, so ist unser gnediger Befehl, Ir wollet bei den Amanuensibus, welche Ewr Concept mundirn, anhalten, daß sie die Exemplaria ohne lengern Verzug fertigen. Und da ein Exemplar oder zwey aller dings, wie es sein soil, absolvirt, wöllet Ir uns selbige alsbald zukonnen lassen, und daran sein, damit die Amanuenses mit die übrigen auch nicht seumig sein. Daran beschicht unser gnedige Mainung. Und sein wir euch mit allen Gnaden wol genaigt. Datum Stutgart den 10 September Anno etc. 86.

"Friedrich. An D. Jacobum Andreae Propst und Cantzlern bei der Universitet zu Tübingen."

8.
Acta, A2v.-A3r.
9.
Ibid., A4v: "Acta illius colloquii bona fide fuisse collecta."
10.
Ibid., A4v-B1r: "Neque vero nos piguit, nostra etiam manu ea annotare, quae ab adversa parte contra piam simplicem & sinceram doctrinam, in Christiana nostra Catechesi comprehensam, dicebantur, atque pertinaciter asserbantur."
11.
Ibid., B3r-C2r, and pp. 574-75.

-176-

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The Colloquy of Montbeliard: Religion and Politics in the Sixteenth Century
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments v
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Abbreviations xiii
  • Introduction 3
  • Notes 10
  • 1 - Ancient Liberties and Evangelical Reform 11
  • Notes 32
  • 2 - The Political Background 45
  • Notes 60
  • 3 - The Lord's Supper 73
  • Notes 100
  • 4 - The Person of Christ 110
  • Notes 126
  • 5 - Images, Baptism, and Predestination 134
  • 6 - Aftermath (1): Polemics and Politics 160
  • Notes 176
  • 7 - Aftermath (2): The Larger Scene 187
  • Notes 192
  • Appendix 1 Appendix: in Which Is Taught, What Was Done, Regarding the Communication and Protest of the French Exiles After the Colloquy of Montbéliard 197
  • Notes 201
  • Appendix 2 - Instrument 203
  • Appendix 3 207
  • Note 210
  • Bibliography of Works Cited 211
  • Index 221
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