The Colloquy of Montbeliard: Religion and Politics in the Sixteenth Century

By Jill P. Raitt | Go to book overview

freed those who had been imprisoned. Protestants could build churches in designated towns and, in short, exercise their rights as citizens of France. But these events, the subject of innumerable essays and books, lie outside our present inquiry. Here I must add a grace note to draw the international aspect into relation with at least one of the collocutors at Montbéliard. Henry IV met Beza on November 25, 1600, while the king camped with his troops near Geneva. 26 Hiding his pain that Henry, on whom he had pinned so many hopes for the Protestant cause, had become a Catholic, the frail old churchman rode to the village of l'Eluiset. It had been more than thirty years since they had met. Henry embraced Beza, calling him his father and his friend. The king seated the old gentleman and remained standing himself while they talked. Beza dined with Henry and, declining a royal invitation to spend the night, returned to Geneva. 27


Notes
1.
See chap. 6, p. 173.
2.
Simon Goulart, Recueil des choses Memorables advenues en France. Le Premier / Recueil, / contenant / les choses plus me- / morables advenues / sous / la ligue, / tant en France, Angleterre, qu'autre lieux. 1590. N.p., n.d. See Paul Chaix, Alain Dufour , and Gustave Moeckli, Les Livres imprirmés à Genève de 1550 à 1600 ( Geneva: Librairie Droz, 1966), 128, which gives Heidelberg as the place and Jérôme Commelin as the printer. But see the whole entry for the opinion of E. Droz that Goulart edited only the volumes subsequent to the 1590 edition. Cf. Paul Heitz, Genfer Buckdrucker und Verlegerzeichen im xv., xvi. und xvii. Jahrhundert ( Strasbourg: Heitz, 1908). For vols. 1 and 2, see ibid., pp. 50-51, no. 168, which gives Geneva as the place but no name for the printer. The printer's mark had moved from Lyon to Strasbourg to Geneva. For vols. 3-6, see ibid., pp. 44-45, no. 146, which gives Geneva as the place and Jacobum Stoer as the printer. The Harangue is found in vol. 1, pp. 507-16: "Harangue des Ambassadeurs des Princes Protestans d'Allemagne faicte au Roy. Sire, Les tres-puissans Electeurs Palatin, Saxon, Brandenbourg, & les autres tres-illustres Princes Joachim Frideric Marquis de Brandebourg, & Administrateur de Magdebourg, Jules de Bronsvic & Lunebourg, Guillaume, Loys, & Georges Landgraves de Hesse freres: Et loachim Ernest Prince de Chat, avecques les quatres villes libres imperiales & principalles de toutes les autres, Strasbourg, Ulmes, Nurnberg & Francfort, tous de la Religion reformee & estans du saincte Empire, nous ont envoyé vers vostre Majeste." Hutten and Issenbourg and others had to leave when Henry III was not there to meet them in August. The time of the meeting was October 1586.
3.
Ibid., 513: The Pope "d'un costé ne chercheroit d'establir sa principaute insatiable, & par ce moyen anéantir les privileges de l'Eglise Gallicane." It should be noted that the arguments of the German princes repeated those of Queen Elizabeth in the letters addressed to these princes urging them to join her in forming a Protestant League.
4.
Goulart, Recueil 1:3v-4r. For another contemporary account of the German embassy to Henry III, see Thou, Histoire universelle 9:597-98.
5.
Cited in Rott, Histoire 275, n. 9, as" 'Fleury au roi eta Brulart. Soleure, 19

-192-

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The Colloquy of Montbeliard: Religion and Politics in the Sixteenth Century
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments v
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Abbreviations xiii
  • Introduction 3
  • Notes 10
  • 1 - Ancient Liberties and Evangelical Reform 11
  • Notes 32
  • 2 - The Political Background 45
  • Notes 60
  • 3 - The Lord's Supper 73
  • Notes 100
  • 4 - The Person of Christ 110
  • Notes 126
  • 5 - Images, Baptism, and Predestination 134
  • 6 - Aftermath (1): Polemics and Politics 160
  • Notes 176
  • 7 - Aftermath (2): The Larger Scene 187
  • Notes 192
  • Appendix 1 Appendix: in Which Is Taught, What Was Done, Regarding the Communication and Protest of the French Exiles After the Colloquy of Montbéliard 197
  • Notes 201
  • Appendix 2 - Instrument 203
  • Appendix 3 207
  • Note 210
  • Bibliography of Works Cited 211
  • Index 221
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