Essays on Time-Based Linguistic Analysis

By Charles-James N. Bailey | Go to book overview

8
Reconstructing Language Development: Two Principles of Change
Without wishing to take sides here on the subject of Barschel "'Der Modusbestand des Hethitischen: Eine Altertümlichkeit?'" ( 1986) I would like to suggest a consideration which ought to be, in my view, an essential ingredient in this sort of discussion, namely current knowledge on how new languages come into being--best summed up in Mühlhäusler ( 1986b). We need to ask ourselves questions like the following:1
Why would Dutch give place to a new language in Africa--Afrikaans?
Why would Old French (or even Anglo-Saxon) yield place to a new language in medieval Britain--Middle English?
Why would current English give place to Bislama and many other daughter languages in many parts of the world today?
Why would any language come into being to replace those already on the ground?
How does a newly born language develop into maturity?

The answers to these questions, using current knowledge on the subject, should be utilized in reconstructing past developments. (Note that Bislama, Tok Pisin, Krio, Sranan--all national languages in different countries--are related to current English in much the same way that Middle English was related to Old French (see Ch. 10).

Languages give way to others because of problems with them in a given social context. Often, a situation will be sufficiently multilingual to require a single lingua franca, while at the same time the speakers involved may have inadequate access to fully developed languages other than their own, all of which have too many complexities to be quickly learned by others. Anyhow, complexities facilitating stylistic differences are not needed for the few functions which a lingua franca is initially needed to serve. Indeed, it should be asked whether there is any other way for a new language to come into existence than as a pidgin becoming a creole (which, unlike a pidgin, has got native- speakers, and, unlike all but very advanced pidgins, has got a relatively fixed (but growing and constantly enlarging) grammar and lexicon). Once 'born',

____________________
1
Such questions are of course by definition outside the scope of synchronic theories and models.

-288-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Essays on Time-Based Linguistic Analysis
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 426

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.