Ravishing Maidens: Writing Rape in Medieval French Literature and Law

By Kathryn Gravdal | Go to book overview

Notes

Introduction
1.
For an overview of the debate over Richardson Clarissa, see Sue Warrick Doederlein , "Clarissa in the Hands of the Critics"," Eighteenth Century Studies 16 (Summer 1983):401-14. Key texts in the Clarissa dispute are the following: William Beatty Warner , "Reading Rape: Marxist-Feminist Figurations of the Literal"," Diacritics 13 (Winter 1983): 28; Terry Eagleton, "The Rape of Clarissa: Writing, Sexuality, and Class Struggle in Samuel Richardson" ( Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1982), 14; Nancy K. Miller, "The Heroine's Text: Readings in the French and English Novel", 1722-1782 ( New York: Columbia University Press, 1980), xii, 95; Terry Castle , "Clarissa's Ciphers: Meaning and Disruption in Richardson's Clarissa" ( Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1982), 28, 116. For studies of sexual violence in Latin literature, see Patricia Kleindienst Joplin, "The Voice of the Shuttle Is Ours"," Stanford Literature Review 1 1984.: 25-53, and also Leo C. Curran, "Rape and Rape Victims in the Metamorphoses"," Arethusa II ( 1978):213-41. On rape in Shakespeare see Catharine R. Stimpson , "Shakespeare and the Soil of Rape"," in The Woman's Part: Feminist Criticism of Shakespeare, ed. Carolyn Ruth Smith Lenz, Gayle Greene, and Carol Thomas Neely ( Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1980), whose feminist analysis can be contrasted to that of Joel Fineman, "Shakespeare's Will: The Temporality of Rape"," in Representations 20 ( 1987):25-76. Lynn Higgins and Brenda Silver have edited a collection of articles on literature of various periods, entitled Rape and Representation ( Columbia University Press, forthcoming).
2.
The complexity of meanings latent in depictions of rape, whether in the plastic arts, philosophy, science, or literature, is commented on by Sylvana Tomaselli in the Introduction to the volume she has edited with Roy Porter, "Rape: An Historical and Social Enquiry" ( Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1986), 2.
3.
Annette Kolodny, "Dancing Through the Minefield: Some Observations on the Theory, Practice, and Politics of a Feminist Literary Criticism"," in The New Feminist Criticism: Essays on Women, Literature and Theory, ed. Elaine Showalter ( New York: Pantheon, 1985), 147.
4.
Tomaselli gives this point a much broader application in her Introduction, noting that classical and premodern cultures discuss rape most openly and actively ( Tomaselli and Porter, 2).
5.
Tomaselli and Porter, 10.
6.
Tillie Olsen, Silences ( London: Virago, 1980), 239-40.
7.
Hélène Cixous, "Le rire de la méduse"," L'Arc 61 ( 1975):2; "The Laugh of the Medusa"," trans. Suzanne Horer and Jeanne Socquet, in New French Feminisms, ed. Elaine Marks and Isabelle de Courtivron ( New York: Schocken Books, 1981), 257.

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