INDEX OF NAMES

AEACUS: son of Zeus and Aegina, the eponymous nymph of the island near Athens, on which Aeacus lived. He was famous for his piety, for being Achilles' grandfather, and for becoming one of the judges of the underworld. Plato is the first to name these judges, at Apology 41a.

ALCETAS: Alcetas (along with Alexander, Perdiccas, and Philip) are common names in the Macedonian royal family. This one was the brother of Perdiccas II (q.v.). On Perdiccas' death, Alcetas could have gained the throne, but he and his son Alexander were killed by Archelaus (q.v.) as rivals to his own dynastic ambitions.

ALCIBIADES: 452-404 BC. A talented statesman and military tactician with immense wealth and personal charisma, who squandered all this potential by scandalous personal behaviour and oligarchic political associations. Exiled in 415 BC, when he was about to take command of Athens' do-or-die expedition to Sicily, he went over to Athens' enemies, before becoming a kind of overlord in Thrace and allying himself once more with Athens. His reinstatement in Athens in 407 was shortlived, and he soon fled to his northern territories, where he was assassinated by agents of the Persian king. His friendship with Socrates is vividly portrayed in Plato Symposium.

ALEXANDER: son of Alcetas (q.v.), murdered by Archelaus (q.v.).

AMPHION: son of Antiope and Zeus, and brother of Zethus. He was a legendary musician, and in Euripides' Antiope (performed c. 410 BC) he represented the passive virtues of culture and contemplation, while his brother represented ambition and political involvement.

ANAXAGORAS: c. 500-428 BC, from Clazomenae. One of the most complex and significant of the pre-Socratic philosophers or protoscientists. His work was well known in Athens, where he stayed for some years and was a personal friend of Pericles.

ANDRON: a friend of Callicles. A member of the moderate oligarchic government of Four Hundred in 411 BC, he turned informant to save his skin when the oligarchy collapsed.

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  • Gorgias i
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction ix
  • Select Bibliography xxxvii
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  • Explanatory Notes 137
  • Index of Names 167
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