Memories of Hawthorne

By Rose Hawthorne Lathrop | Go to book overview

CHAPTER II
THE DAYS OF THE ENGAGEMENT

THE engagement of Hawthorne to his future wife was now a fact, but it was not spoken of except to one or two persons. Sophia had slipped away for a visit to friends in Boston; but as Elizabeth was at present in Newton, her letters to the latter continued as follows: --

WEST STREET, BOSTON, May 19, 1839.

DEAREST LIZZIE, -- Two days ago Mr. Hawthorne came. He said that there was nothing to which he could possibly compare his surprise, to find that the bird had flown when he went to our house. He said he sat for half an hour in the parlor before he knocked to announce his presence, feeling sure I would know he was there, and descend, -- till at last he was tired of waiting. "Oh, it was terrible to find you gone," he said. And it was such a loss, to be sure, to me not to see him. I am glad you enjoyed his visit so much. He told me he should be at the picture- gallery the next morning [Sophia went very early to avoid the crowd], and there I found him at eight o'clock. He came home with me through a piercing east wind, which he was sure would make me ill for a week. In the evening he came

-27-

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Memories of Hawthorne
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Preface iii
  • Contents v
  • Chapter I - The Hawthornes and the Peabodys 1
  • Chapter II - The Days of the Engagement 27
  • Chapter III - The Early Days of the Marriage 49
  • Chapter IV - Life in Salem 84
  • Chapter V - From Salem to Berkshire 115
  • Chapter VI - Lenox 139
  • Chapter VII - From Lenox to Concord 163
  • Chapter VIII - The Liverpool Consulate 198
  • Chapter IX - English Days: 1 234
  • Chapter X - English Daysl: 11 273
  • Chapter Xi English Days: III 318
  • Chapter XII - Italian Days:1 352
  • Chapter XIII - Italian Days: II 381
  • Chapter XIV - The Wayside 412
  • Chapter XV - The Artist at Work 439
  • Chapter XVI - The Leave-Taking 455
  • Index of Persons 481
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