Asian American Literature: An Introduction to the Writings and Their Social Context

By Elaine H. Kim | Go to book overview

5
Japanese American Family and Community Portraits

Like the Chinese Americans, Japanese Americans have been affected by the fluctuating relationship between their country of origin and their new land. Anti-Japanese activities, culminating in the mass internment of almost the entire Japanese American minority on the West Coast after the declaration of war against Japan, profoundly influenced the social and economic status of the Japanese in America, the development and shape of their communities, and the attitudes and behavior of individual Japanese Americans. By the eve of World War II the Japanese communities in the United States had evolved a pattern of economic and social life that paralleled but existed outside the mainstream of American society. Unlike the Chinese community, which had become predominantly urban by the end of the nineteenth century and which was comprised primarily of foreign-born men living in America as bachelors, about half of the Japanese Americans were living in rural areas clustered around small Japanese towns, or nihonmachis, all through the western United States. Moreover, the American-born Japanese, or nisei, had outnumbered the immigrants, or issei, by 1930.

Because of Japan's status as a rising power in the Pacific, the absence of foreign occupation or direct intervention, and the country's rapid industrial modernization, fueled by unimpeded Japanese colonization of Korea and Formosa, conditions of Japanese immigration more closely paralleled European than other Asian immigration. While it is true that the majority of Japanese who came to America between 1885 and 1907 were single young men, they were not the most impoverished persons in their homeland and were also relatively well educated, 1 especially about American life and customs. They had had opportunities to become familiar with the currents of Western thought and modern Western life: in the

-122-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Asian American Literature: An Introduction to the Writings and Their Social Context
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 363

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.