Asian American Literature: An Introduction to the Writings and Their Social Context

By Elaine H. Kim | Go to book overview

Notes

Preface
1.
During World War II, when Japan was an enemy nation and China an ally, an article titled "How To Tell Your Friends from the Japs" appeared in Time magazine ( Dec. 22, 1941), offering readers "a few rules of thumb" that were "not always reliable" since "there is no infallible way of telling them apart." According to the article, virtually all Japanese are short and thin, tending to "dry up. . . as they age," while Chinese are tall and better built. Japanese can be distinguished by their hard-heeled, stiffly erect gait and their hesitancy and nervousness in conversation as well as by their loud laughter at in- appropriate times. But the key difference between Chinese and Japanese, the writer contends, is in facial expression: the Chinese expression is "more placid, kindly, open," while the Japanese is "dogmatic, arrogant."
2.
See, for example, Ronald Tanaka, "On the Metaphysical Foundations of Sansei Poetics", Journal of Ethnic Studies 7, no. 2 (summer 1979): 1-36; Bruce Iwasaki , "Response and Change for the Asian in America", Roots: An Asian American Reader, ed. Amy Tachiki et al. ( Los Angeles: UCLA Asian American Studies Center, 1971), and "Introduction: Asian American Literature", Coun- terpoint: Perspectives on Asian America, ed. Emma Gee ( Los Angeles: UCLA Asian American Studies Center, 1976).
3.
Kai-yu Hsu and Helen Palubinskas, eds., Asian American Authors ( Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co., 1972); Frank Chin, Jeffery Paul Chan, Lawson Fusao Inada , and Shawn Hsu Wong, eds., Aiiieeeee! An Anthology of Asian-American Writers ( Washington, D.C.: Howard University Press, 1974).
4.
On A Daughter of the Samurai, see New York Tribune, Nov.22, 1925, p. 10;on East Goes West, Ladie Hosie, "A Voice from Korea," Saturday Review of Litera- ture, April 4, 1931, p. 707;on Father and Glorious Descendant, Library Journal 68, no. 7 ( April 1, 1943): 287;on American in Disguise, Phoebe Adams, "Short Reviews: Books", Atlantic Monthly 227, no. 4 ( April 1971): 104;on Farewell to

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