Antitrust, Innovation, and Competitiveness

By Thomas M. Jorde; David J. Teece | Go to book overview

Table P-1 Average Annual Productivity Growth by Sectors, 1960-1987
Total
Agriculture Manufacturing Service Economy
United Sates 3.1% 2.8% 0.9% 1.2%
Canada 3.3 2.7 1.5 1.8
Japan 3.9 7.8 3.9 5.4
Germany 5.0 3.4 2.3 3.1
European Community 5.2 4.0 1.9 3.1
Source: Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, Historical Statistics, 1960-1987 ( Paris, 1989).

ing once again to take account of innovation and what has been called dynamic competition. Many thought the existing frameworks dealt with such matters satisfactorily. Others seemed to think these matters were not particularly important or central to U.S. competitiveness. The following chapters embody those diverse views. (A synopsis of each chapter is provided in the last section of our Introduction.) We believe that in the following pages a strong suggestion emerges that U.S. antitrust policy needs additional adjustment before it connects soundly with the reality of global competition driven by technological and organizational innovation.

Berkeley T.M.J.

April 1991 D.J.T.


NOTES
1.
We are extremely grateful for financial support from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation which made the conference and the book possible. Staff support has also been critical to this endeavor. In particular, Denise Kidder made the necessary conference arrangements, Lou Maull facilitated the finances, and Patricia Murphy tirelessly and enthusiastically prepared conference materials and the papers for this book. The editors are very grateful for their dedicated help, for their tenacity, for their good humor, and for their consummate skill.
2.
President's Commission on Industrial Competitiveness, Global Competition: The New Reality, vol. 1 ( Washington, D.C.: Superintendent of Documents, 1985), p. 42.

-viii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Antitrust, Innovation, and Competitiveness
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Notes viii
  • Contents ix
  • Contributors xi
  • 1 - Introduction 3
  • Notes 25
  • References 27
  • 2 - Antitrust Law as Industrial Policy: Should Judges and Juries Make It? 29
  • Notes 45
  • 3 - Innovation, Cooperation, and Antitrust 47
  • Notes 63
  • References 68
  • Appendix: National Cooperative Research and Commercialization Act (ncrca) 71
  • 4 - Antitrust: Source of Dynamic and Static Inefficiencies? 82
  • Notes 95
  • References 96
  • 5 - Agreements Between Competitors 98
  • Notes 114
  • 6 - Ignorance and Antithrust 119
  • Notes 132
  • 7 - Antitrust Lenses and the Uses of Transaction Cost Economics Reasoning 137
  • Notes 158
  • References 161
  • 8 - Monopoly Conduct, Especially Leveraging Power from One Product or Market to Another 165
  • 9 - Market Structure and Technical Advance: The Role of Patent Scope Decisions 185
  • Notes 219
  • 10 - Conclusion 233
  • Index 235
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 246

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.