The New Red Negro: The Literary Left and African American Poetry, 1930-1946

By James Edward Smethurst | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Many people have supported, influenced, and generally made possible this project. As usual, all shortcomings are strictly my own and should not be attributed in any way to the people listed here.

I am grateful to those scholars at Harvard, visiting and resident, who gave me a broad view of American literature and culture and "ethnic studies," especially Dwight Andrews, Sacvan Bercovitch, Juan Bruce-Novoa, King-Kok Cheung, Laurence de Looze, Henry Louis Gates Jr., Maryemma Graham, Phillip Brian Harper, the late Nathan Huggins, Walter Jackson, Meredith McGill, and Jeffrey Melnick.

I am also indebted to many scholars outside Harvard who have encouraged me, read drafts of my work, shared panels with me, commented on conference papers, shared their own work, and provided invaluable material and/or advice for my project. I am most grateful to Kenneth Rosen of the University of Southern Maine and James De Jongh of CUNY who in various ways inspired the direction my work has taken. Among the many other scholars to whom I owe thanks are Byrne Fone, John Gennari, Cheryl Greenberg, Leo Hamalian, Matthew Jacobson, Robin Kelley, Diana Linden, Bill Maxwell, William McFeeley, Jim Miller, Bill Mullen, Richard Newman, Susan Pennybacker, Paula Rabinowitz, Mark Solomon, Patricia Sullivan, Michael Thurston, and Alan Wald (whose knowledge of literary radicalism is only surpassed by his generosity in sharing that knowledge).

Much gratitude is due to those friends with whom I have shared (and argued about) poetry, politics, food, music, and all the other things that make life worth liv-

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