Civic Virtues: Rights, Citizenship, and Republican Liberalism

By Richard Johnson Dagger | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 7
Encouraging Citizenship

In Part I of this book, I tried to show how a concern for individual rights is compatible with a commitment to the importance of community, duty, and virtue. Rousseau's contractarian republicanism reinforces this point. But Rousseau's outline of an association in which each man unites with all yet obeys only himself and remains as free as before also points up the difficulty of ensuring the civic virtue necessary to republican liberalism. That is, he leaves us with the question of whether republican liberalism is practically possible.

The question arises because republican liberalism ties individual rights to civic duties by way of reciprocity and fair play. Those who enjoy the benefits of a cooperative enterprise, such as the rights guaranteed by a political order, must also bear their share of the burdens of the enterprise. They must act as citizens, in Rousseau's terms, not as men. Yet if Rousseau is right, people are typically inclined to follow their particular wills rather than their general will. Even if he is wrong, the size, diversity, and complexity of the modern state make it difficult for us to see ourselves as members of a body politic that is also a cooperative enterprise. If we cannot see ourselves as citizens, in Rousseau's sense, we cannot act as citizens. For republican liberalism to work, it must be possible to overcome these difficulties by finding ways to foster citizenship. But is this possible?

The first step toward an answer is to explicate the conception of citizenship at work here and to explain why citizenship of this sort is worth encouraging. I take up these tasks in the first two sections of this chapter. In the third section I turn to the problem of identifying tactics for encouraging citizenship that are compatible with republican liberalism.


Republican-Liberal Citizenship

As Rousseau conceived of it, citizenship is intimately related to civic virtue-so intimately that he practically defined "citizen" as "one who acts

-98-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Civic Virtues: Rights, Citizenship, and Republican Liberalism
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 258

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.