The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Opera

By John Warrack; Ewan West | Go to book overview

M

Maag, Peter (b St Gallen, 10 May 1919). Swiss conductor. Studied Zurich, Basle, and Geneva, with Hoesslin and Marek. Répétiteur and chorus-master Biel-Solothurn 1943, cond. 1945-6; Düsseldorf 1952-4; music dir. Bonn 1954-9, incl. Rappresentazione di anima e di corpo and Genoveva; Vienna, V, 1964. London, CG, 1958, 1977. New York, M, 19729. After successful appearances in various Italian theatres, including Venice and Parma, music dir. Turin, R, 1974-6. Especially successful in Mozart. (R)

Maazel, Lorin (b Neuilly, 6 Mar. 1930). US conductor. Studied Pittsburgh with Bakaleinikoff. Début as conductor aged 9. Bayreuth 1968-9; New York, M, 1962; Rome 1965; Artistic dir. Berlin, D, 1965-71; London, CG, 1978; dir. Vienna, S, 1982-4, from which he resigned amid controversy. Repertory incl. Don Giovanni, Lohengrin, Ring, Luisa Miller, Otello (Verdi), Rosenkavalier, Thaïs, first Ulisse (Dallapiccola). A talented, efficient, highly successful conductor. (R)

Mabellini, Teodulo (b Pistoia, 2 Apr. 1817; d Florence, 10 Mar. 1897). Italian conductor and composer. Studied Florence with Pillotti and Gherardeschi. Following his early success with Matilda e Toledo ( 1836), the Grand Duke Leopold II provided funds for him to study with Mercadante. His next opera, Rolla ( 1840), confirmed his promise; settled in Florence 1843, where he conducted the Societh Filarmonica, and became maestro di cappella to the Tuscan court ( 1847), and director of the T alla Pergola ( 1848). His nine operas, which include I Veneziani a Costantinopoli ( 1844) and Fiametta ( 1857), owe much to Mercadante's style, and enjoyed some popularity,

Macbeth. Opera in 4 acts by Verdi; text by Piave, after Shakespeare's tragedy ( 1605-6). Prem. Florence, P, 14 Mar. 1847. For the 1865 Paris prem., Verdi made a revised version whose principal features were the addition of 'La luce langue' for Lady Macbeth, alterations to Act III including 'Ora di morte' for Macbeth and Lady Macbeth, and in Act IV new choruses at the opening and close. This is the version usually now performed.

Scotland, 11th cent. A chorus of witches greets Macbeth (bar) as Thane of Cawdor and King of Scotland, and Banquo(bs) as the father of kings. Macbeth is duly announced Thane of Cawdor. Lady Macbeth (sop) persuades her husband to murder King Duncan (silent), when he stays with them at Dunsinane that night, so as to gain the throne for himself.

Macbeth is named King of Scotland and orders that Banquo and his son Fleance (silent) be killed in order to prevent the remainder of the witches' prophecy coming true. However, Fleance escapes, and Macbeth is haunted, during a banquet, by images of Banquo.

The witches tell the anxious Macbeth that he will be safe until Birnam Wood comes to Dunsinane.

Lady Macbeth walks in her sleep, to the alarm of her maid and the doctor. The English army, under Duncan's son Malcolm (ten), advances, disguised with branches taken from Birnam Wood. Macduff(ten) kills Macbeth.

McCabe, John (b Huyton, 21 Apr. 1939). English composer. Career as a concert pianist, then dir. of the London Coll. of Music. An eclectic composer, he has drawn inspiration from Stravinsky, Hindemith, and Bartók among others. His stage works, usually written with the abilities of specific performers in mind, include the children's opera The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe ( 1969) and the chamber opera The Play of Mother Courage ( 1974).

McCormack, John (b Athlone, 14 June 1884; d Dublin, 16 Sept. 1945). Irish, later US, tenor. Studied Milan with Sabatini. Début Savona 1906 (Fritz). London, CG, 1907-14; New York: Manhattan OC, 1909; M, 1910-18. On his own admission a poor actor; retired from opera 1923, devoting himself to concert work. An outstanding singer, with a sweet, limpid tone, formidable breath control, and exquisite phrasing. Celebrated as Don Ottavio, Elvino, Rodolfo, Edgardo, and Duke of Mantua. (R)

McCracken, James (b Gary, IN, 11 Dec. 1926; d New York, 30 Apr. 1988). US tenor. Studied New York with Ezekiel and Pagano, later

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The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Opera
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Key to Vocal Compasses x
  • Abbreviations xi
  • A 1
  • B 28
  • C 72
  • D 112
  • E 144
  • F 157
  • G 181
  • H 218
  • I 241
  • J 251
  • K 259
  • L 277
  • M 305
  • N 356
  • O 370
  • P 384
  • Q 419
  • R 421
  • S 449
  • T 505
  • U 525
  • V 529
  • W 545
  • X 563
  • Y 564
  • Z 565
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