Mythology: From Ancient to Post-Modern

By Jürgen Kleist; Bruce A. Butterfield | Go to book overview

is the overarching feature of the universe, a universe that is "going somewhere." Or to put it differently, there is a story to the universe. Just when the modern world-view, with its dismal implications, is dying, we are being presented with a a new vision of reality -- a new cosmic vision -- that holds promise of reuniting us with nature.


References
1
E = mc2 tells us that mass can be converted into energy and vice versa. Thus, mass is a form of energy.
2
See Gordon Research Conference on "The Origin of Life," New HampU+00A- shire, August, 1990.
3
The Greek philosopher Democritus ( 460-370 B.C.) was the first major proponent of atomism. In this view, everything is either space-filling matter or emptiness, the void. In order to account for the changes obU+00A- served in matter, Democritus thought of matter as being made up of inU+00A- numerable small particles. Since these small particles are solid they are called "atoms" or "dense bodies." See Eduard Zeller, Outlines of the HisU+00A- tory of Greek Philosophy ( Dover, 1980), pp. 64-68.
4
See: Benjamin Lee Whorf, Language, Thought, and Reality ( The M.I.T. Press, 1956), pp. 51-64. In process languages, such as Hopi, there is no refU+00A- erence to "objects" in the sense that we use that term. Nothing is static -- and therefore fixed for all time -- but all is becoming. Therefore, there can be no labels. As a result, people cannot be "objectified" into static entiU+00A- ties.
5
In the first part of the twentieth century, this denial of an interior beU+00A- came the basis of behaviorism. Although psychology has backed away from this extreme materialism, today behaviorism still dominates much of American psychology, and "physicalism" says that consciousness is someU+00A- how just an emergent property of matter.
6
P. A. Sorokin, The Crisis of Our Age. 1951.

-167-

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