Learning Theory, Personality Theory, and Clinical Research: The Kentucky Symposium

By Donald K. Adams; O. H. Mowrer et al. | Go to book overview

Foreword

In recent years learning theory, personality theory, and clinical research have been among the most vigorously cultivated fields in American psychology. Many workers in these fields have tried to integrate the results of their labor. Some learning theorists have devoted themselves to problems which seem important also for personality theory and clinical psychology. Since the aim of psychotherapy is to produce changes, and the study of such changes is the study of learning, some clinicians interested in psychotherapy have looked to learning theory for help in explaining the development of normal and abnormal personalities and for guidance in building up a theory of psychotherapy.

In order to encourage current tendencies leading toward a closer integration of these three branches of psychology, the Department of Psychology of the University of Kentucky decided in the autumn of 1952 to hold a symposium on the relationships among these three areas. The original proposal was made by Dr. Robert E. Bills, who was made Chairman of a Symposium Committee, the other members of which were Drs. Lysle W. Croft, P. L. Mellenbruch, Robert D. North, and Harold Webster. The University administration gave its cordial support to the project, and a number of distinguished psychologists accepted invitations to contribute lectures.

The papers here published were presented at the Symposium on March 13 and 14, 1953, before members of the University community and a considerable number of visitors.

We wish to express our thanks to the President of the University, Dr. Herman L. Donovan, for his interest and for his address of welcome at the opening meeting. We also wish to thank Dr. James S. Calvin, Dr. Betsy W. Estes, Dr. Charles F. Diehl, Dr. Ernest Meyers, Professor Edward Newbury, and Mrs. Lysle W. Croft for their contributions, made in a variety of ways, to the success of the Symposium. Dr. Frank A. Pattie was asked to assume the task of publication of the Symposium, and we wish to express our appreciation of his work in finding a publisher and in seeing the book through the press.

THE SYMPOSIUM COMMITTEE

Lexington, Kentucky, February 12, 1954

-v-

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