Learning Theory, Personality Theory, and Clinical Research: The Kentucky Symposium

By Donald K. Adams; O. H. Mowrer et al. | Go to book overview

Personality Structures as Learning and Motivation Patterns A Theme for the Integration of Methodologies

RAYMOND B. CATTELL

We have come together at this symposium hoping for an easy and happy marriage of two young branches of psychological science; but the tragedy of Romeo and Juliet should remind us that the failure to consider rivalries of parentage can lead to difficulties even when true love exists between the parties--and I am not at all sure that it does in this easel Consequently if our purpose is to arrive at joint concepts and methods we must first face some embarrassing inquiries about the implicit viewpoints and ancestries of the parties concerned. As a personality theorist, my role at this marriage is perhaps that of mother-in-law to learning theory, so your expectations of sweet reasonableness on my part must be according to your personal projections in this situation.

Quite apart from these immediate differences we have to recognize that our more remote common ancestor, psychology, was itself a problem child among the sciences, always boasting to answer the spectacular questions--and by polysyllabic global theories--before it acquired the patience and method effectively to answer the small questions about behavior. Theoretically, for example, it indulged in such pretentious mathematical-sounding names as topology and in such elaborately complete motivational and structural systems as those of psychoanalysis, without first establishing accurate methods of description and measurement upon which reliable and worthwhile laws could be based, or determining personality structure by objective, multivariate, factor-analytic methods. Second, it failed to develop objective test measures for whatever patterns had been shown to be functionally independent or dimensionally clear. When this is

-91-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Learning Theory, Personality Theory, and Clinical Research: The Kentucky Symposium
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 168

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.