The St. Lawrence Waterway: A Study in Politics and Diplomacy

By William R. Willoughby | Go to book overview

PREFACE

More than three hundred years ago the St. Lawrence was described by Jacques Cartier, its first French explorer, as "the greatest river . . . to have ever been seen." And, judged by virtually any standard other than mere length, the St. Lawrence is in truth pre-eminent. "Its mouth and estuary are both so vast that their salt waters far exceed those of all other river systems put together. Its tide runs farther in from the Atlantic than any other tide from this or any other ocean. And its 'Great Lakes' contain more fresh water than all the world beside."* With its lakes and tributaries, the river forms a waterway 2347 miles in length and drains an area of more than 300,000 square miles, rich in farms, factories, mines, and resources. Each second the river discharges some 262,000 cubic feet of water into the Gulf of St. Lawrence, and its flow is so steady, and its daily fluctuations are so slight, as to provide almost ideal conditions for the operation of a powerhouse or a navigation canal.

That such a river system would play a significant role in the history of North America was inevitable. It was the highway to the heart of the continent long before the white man came. It remained the same until well into the second half of the nineteenth century, when it was forced into a position of secondary importance by the coming of the railway. It made possible the activities of the early French explorers and priests. It provided natural navigation for "the bark canoes of the picturesque voyageur and the savage redskin as they carried on their task of linking

____________________
*
William Wood, All A float, A Chronicle of Craft and Waterways ( 1914), p. 1.

-vii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The St. Lawrence Waterway: A Study in Politics and Diplomacy
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 381

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.