The St. Lawrence Waterway: A Study in Politics and Diplomacy

By William R. Willoughby | Go to book overview

CHAPTER II
ADDITIONAL CANADIAN IMPROVEMENTS 1826-1848

Prior to the opening of the Erie Canal in 1825 the odds in the centuries- old competition between the St. Lawrence and the Mohawk-Hudson routes for the commerce of the West favored the St. Lawrence. Although the St. Lawrence's excellence as a waterway was marred by the absence of canals around the falls of Niagara and around the rapids between Ogdensburg and Cornwall, its unimproved sections constituted something less than three per cent of its total length. The Mohawk-Hudson route, by contrast, had many long stretches requiring laborious, time- consuming portages. After 1825 the advantages were decidedly on the side of the New York route. Even though its canals were only four feet deep and twenty-eight feet wide, it afforded uninterrupted navigation from the western end of Lake Erie to the Atlantic. Furthermore, it had as its terminus New York City, which boasted numerous advantages over Montreal, the chief port of the St. Lawrence route. These included freedom from ice the year round, a superior harbor, lower charges for wharfage and pilotage, a larger import and export business, better credit and marketing facilities, and lower freight and insurance rates for outbound cargoes.1

The superiority of the Erie was quickly demonstrated. Compared with the $30 per ton cost of shipping goods from Buffalo to Montreal, goods were now transported from Buffalo to New York City for $15. Lumber, stones, ashes, grain, and other produce of the American West, previously unmarketable except by way of the St. Lawrence, were now profitably transported to the Atlantic seaboard.2 "The trade of the West, which had

-16-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The St. Lawrence Waterway: A Study in Politics and Diplomacy
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 381

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.