The St. Lawrence Waterway: A Study in Politics and Diplomacy

By William R. Willoughby | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VII
MOVES TOWARDS COÖPERATIVE ACTION 1914-1921

Although the outbreak of the European war ended all prospects of the immediate development of the St. Lawrence, the four years of the conflict witnessed a number of developments that were to focus attention on the river and greatly strengthen the arguments of the individuals and groups agitating for a deep waterway. One was the opening of the Panama Canal to commercial traffic in August 1914. In terms of transportation costs, the practical effect of this important event was the moving of the Atlantic seaboard one-third nearer the Pacific Coast and the moving of the Midwest one-third farther away. The farmers, industrialists, and shippers of the Midwest now found themselves at a decided disadvantage because of the lower rates which the canal gave their competitors on the eastern and western coasts. For example, it now was cheaper to ship steel from Baltimore to San Francisco by way of the Panama than to ship it from Pittsburgh to Chicago by rail. British Columbia shingles and lumber brought through the canal could compete with eastern lumber, and in the 1920's -- after railway rates between the Prairies and Pacific ports had been appreciably reduced -- "the eastern coast began to feel the tug of wheat to Vancouver."1

A second significant development was the phenomenal increase of agricultural and industrial production in Canada and in the United States in response to the almost unlimited demand of the Allied powers for food, ships, and weapons of war. Between 1913 and 1919 Canada's exports of wheat and flour doubled in quantity; her meat exports rose from $6,000,000 to $85,000,000 and her livestock shipments from $10,-

-84-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The St. Lawrence Waterway: A Study in Politics and Diplomacy
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 381

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.