The St. Lawrence Waterway: A Study in Politics and Diplomacy

By William R. Willoughby | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XII
ADDITIONAL TREATY NEGOTIATIONS 1934-1939

To Pittman and other friends of the Seaway the treaty's defeat was most disheartening. They had exerted themselves to the utmost but had failed by thirteen votes to obtain the requisite two-thirds majority. The Senate, so it seemed, had "quashed forever the prospect of a joint building of the seaway by Canada and the United States."1 To continue the fight for a deep St. Lawrence waterway seemed hardly worth while. With only mild protests from spokesmen of the Midwest, Congress voted $27,000,000 to deepen to 14 feet the New York Barge Canal, the St. Lawrence's traditional rival.2 The opposition, seemingly, had won a complete victory.

Roosevelt, however, was not discouraged. Immediately preceding the Senate vote he had expressed the view that it made "little difference" whether the St. Lawrence project was approved then or later.3 "Just as sure as God made little apples" the Seaway would be built -- if not as a joint project then by Canada alone on her own side of the river. The development of the project was inevitable. Where nature led, man was certain to follow. Four days after the Senate action, he wrote Secretary Cordell Hull: "Will you talk with Frank Walsh about the next steps on the St. Lawrence Treaty? and then talk with me?"4

Walsh suggested that the treaty be revised to make it more acceptable to the American Senate.5 But John Hickerson, State Department specialist on Canadian affairs, thought the better plan would be to negotiate a new treaty. In addition to affording an opportunity for improving the wording and form of the document, a new treaty would "give additional

-160-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The St. Lawrence Waterway: A Study in Politics and Diplomacy
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 381

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.