Wayward Youth: A Psychoanalytic Study of Delinquent Children, Illustrated by Actual Case Histories

By August Aichhorn | Go to book overview

Foreword by SIGMUND FREUD

Of all the fields in which psychoanalysis has been applied none has aroused so much interest, inspired so much hope, and accordingly attracted so many capable workers as the theory and practice of child training. This is easy to understand. The child has become the main object of psychoanalytic research and in this respect has replaced the neurotic with whom the work began. Analysis has revealed that the child lives on almost unchanged in the sick patient as well as in the dreamer and the artist; it has thrown a flood of light on the instinctual forces and impulses which give the childish being its characteristic features; and it has traced the paths of development which proceed to maturity. It is no wonder that expectation was aroused that psychoanalytic work would prove valuable in education, the purpose of which is to guide the child on his way to maturity, to encourage him, and to protect him from taking the wrong path.

My personal share in this application of psychoanalysis has been slight. In my youth, I accepted it as a byword that the three impossible professions are teaching, healing, and

-v-

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Wayward Youth: A Psychoanalytic Study of Delinquent Children, Illustrated by Actual Case Histories
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword v
  • August Aichhorn *
  • Contents *
  • A Note on This Translation *
  • One - Introduction 1
  • Two - The Analysis of a Symptom 8
  • Three - Some Causes of Delinquency 28
  • Four - Some Causes of Delinquency (cont.) 48
  • Five - Underlying Causes Of Delinquency 67
  • Six - The Transference 91
  • Seven - The Training School 111
  • Eight - The Aggressive Group 129
  • Nine - The Meaning of the Reality Principle in Social Behavior 144
  • Ten - Significance of the Ego-Ideal In Social Behavior 162
  • Notes 182
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