Is America Necessary? Conservative, Liberal, & Socialist Perspectives of United States Political Institutions

By Henry Etzkowitz; Peter Schwab | Go to book overview

Conservative

Robert Schrank. The young workers: their influence on the workplace.

This article is about the changing values of work. It is about a growing feeling that a job should be more than a place to make enough money to live on. The reason I choose to deal with changing work values, rather than the economics of employment, is that in the long run, they may be more influential in causing substantial restructuring of the workplace. The new work force, made up of the post World War II babies--all 40 million of them--is by far the best educated the workplace has ever seen. They are physically healthier and they are far more confident about what they want. They have stimulated an anti-authoritarian trend and it continues to grow. The new young worker is creating havoc with old notions about how the workplace ought to be run. Industrial organization, on the other hand, is based on an authoritarian hierarchical structure. Any challenge to that structure can mean a fundamental change of the production organization as we know it.

Who are these new young workers? They are the people who have entered the manufacturing work force in the decade of the sixties, especially the last five years. What I shall describe as the problem behavior of the new work force may refer only to a minority of the new workers. My assumption, however, is that this group represents the future, and what they are challenging represents the past. Clearly there are many new work force people who are behaving in most traditional ways. But it is the group whose behavior is new that is receiving the attention of concerned management people and behavioral scientists.


Challenging traditional ways

A major manufacturing company did a series of interviews with foremen around the country regarding the new work force. The foremen made the following comments:

"They are a hell of a lot smarter."

"They are better educated."

"I figure there are four in any ten of them with any desire to learn the job. The rest are here to do as little as possible."

"They don't give a damn. Watch 'em float around here, back and forth. I have to chase 'em to get any work done."

"They don't have a great fear of management as we had."

"Other generations didn't express themselves; this one does."

"You don't dictate to these people. Today you have to do more asking and suggesting and it sure takes time."

"The new work force presents supervision with problems they didn't know existed as little as five years ago."

"Because of low seniority many are at the bottom of the pay scale and have a tough time making ends meet."

These remarks are typical of sentiments I have frequently heard expressed. At least part of the new work force is challenging many traditional notions about taking orders, meeting production standards, showing up on time or showing up at all. How widespread is the problem? Dozens of major corporations reflect the statements I cited. While the assembly line is not typical of all production, its principles tend to dominate the workplace. It used to be the most efficient production system. Now products come off incomplete and not so well made. "Bring your Mustang back, we forgot to tighten the steering wheel." This same assembly line may have some trouble in getting itself to run because the new work force took off on Friday.

Why? A personnel director says: "Because they earned enough in the four previous days to loaf on Friday. They'll be back Monday and Tuesday when their dough runs out."

We hear about things like Chrysler giving away green stamps to get people to come to work and General Motors giving away colored glasses, just as filling stations do for

-513-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Is America Necessary? Conservative, Liberal, & Socialist Perspectives of United States Political Institutions
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Preface ix
  • Contents xi
  • Introduction 1
  • Part One 15
  • 1 - Where Do I Stand? 17
  • Conservative 21
  • Conclusion 28
  • Socialist 44
  • Notes 46
  • Part Two 57
  • 2 - The Presidency 61
  • Conservative 67
  • Socialist 79
  • Notes 85
  • 3 - The Pentagon 101
  • Conservative 107
  • Socialist 117
  • 4 - The Secret Police 133
  • Conservative 139
  • Socialist 152
  • Notes 160
  • Part Three 167
  • 5 - Elite Clubs and Associations 169
  • Conservative 173
  • Notes 184
  • Notes 192
  • 6 - Multinational Corporations 209
  • Conservative 213
  • Socialist 221
  • Notes 244
  • 7 - Organized Crime 257
  • Conservative 259
  • Socialist 264
  • Part Four 283
  • 8 - Congress 285
  • Conservative 289
  • Socialist 296
  • Notes 303
  • 9 - The Courts 315
  • Conservative 319
  • Socialist 330
  • Notes 337
  • 10 - Regulatory Agencies 347
  • Conservative 349
  • Socialist 361
  • Notes 369
  • Political Parties 385
  • Conservative 387
  • Liberal 396
  • Conclusion 410
  • 12 - Academia 413
  • Conservative 416
  • References 427
  • Notes 434
  • Part Five 449
  • 13 - The Media 451
  • Conservative 453
  • Liberal 467
  • Notes 474
  • 14 - Banks 483
  • Conservative The Great Banking Retreat. 485
  • Socialist 489
  • Notes 497
  • 15 - Unions 511
  • Conservative 513
  • Notes 519
  • A Critical Issue 537
  • 16 - The Economic Crisis 539
  • Conservative 542
  • Socialist 544
  • Notes 550
  • Part Seven 557
  • 17 - Political Programs 567
  • Louis Banks. the Mission Of Our Business Society. 568
  • Ralph Nader and Donald Ross. Toward an Initiatory Democracy. 576
  • Stanley Aronowitz. On Organization: A Good Party Is Hard to Find. 581
  • Mass Parties and Reformism 587
  • Notes 596
  • Fred R. Harris. Up With Those Who'Re Down. 602
  • Part Eight 613
  • Appendix 621
  • Note 644
  • Index 649
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 658

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.