Is America Necessary? Conservative, Liberal, & Socialist Perspectives of United States Political Institutions

By Henry Etzkowitz; Peter Schwab | Go to book overview
a measure of directed growth. For it is in the prospect and promise of breakthrough development that Americans are at home. It is this that ensures the creation of new wealth and product, new conceptual approaches to major problems, reinforcement of individual and humanist values, and a worthy future for this, unique civilization.
NOTES
1. Barbara Hubbard, in a review of "Upwingers: A Futurist Manifesto," The Futurist, February 1974, p. 28.
2. Unpublished paper, Harvard Business School, 1974.
3. Peter F. Drucker, as quoted in Carl Madden, The Clash of Culture ( Washington, National Planning Association, 1972), p. 51.
4. Democracy in America ( New York, Vintage Books, 1945), Vol. I, pp. 450, 451; Vol. 2, p. 151.
5. Ben Wattenberg, The Real America ( New York, Doubleday, 1974). For a less rhapsodic survey of middle-class influence see Thomas C. Cochran , Business in American Life ( New York, McGraw-Hill, 1972). And for a sharp disagreement, attempting to prove that the American blue-collar class is degenerating into a powerful proletariat, see Andrew Levison, "The Working Class Majority," New Yorker, September 2, 1974.
6. See James Baughman, "New Directions in American Economic and Business History," in American History: Retrospect and Prospect, edited by G. A. Billias and G. N. Grob ( New York, Macmillan, Free Press, 1971).
7. Beyond the Stable State ( New York, Norton, 1973), p. 80.
8. "An Agenda for Research and Development in Corporate Responsiveness," unpublished paper, Harvard Business School, 1974.
9. "Suffering a Sea Change," June 29, 1974, p. 41.
10. Ivan Illich, Tools for Conviviality ( New York, Harper & Row, 1973).
11. Nicholas Georgescu-Roegen, "The Entropy Law and the Economic Problem", in Toward A Steady State Economy, edited by Herman E. Daly ( San Francisco, W. H. Freeman, 1973).
12. Dennis Meadows et al., The Limits to Growth ( New York, New American Library, 1972), p. xi.
13. Thomas M. Humphrey, "The Dismal Science Revisited," Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond Monthly Review, March 1973, p. 2.
14. Barbara Ward, op. cit., p. 49.
15. Management ( New York, Harper & Row, 1974), p. 363.
16. October 1968, pp. 110-122.
17. "The World Corporation: New Weight in an Old Balance," address before the International Industrial Conference, San Francisco, September 1973; published in Vital Speeches, October 15, 1973, p. 18.

John W. Gardner. Citizen action.

The more one examines the web of influence woven by special interests and the accommodation of politicians to that influence, the less one anticipates changes from within the political system itself. It must come from citizens. They will never produce totally sanitary politics; but they can and must regain command of their own instruments of self-government.

Institutions don't overhaul themselves. They find it painful. When an institution is in need of renewal, someone must shake it up. In the case of political institutions, the shakeup must come from concerned citizens determined to create responsive government, determined to bring the parties to life, determined to cut through organizational dry rot and revitalize aging institutions.


The emergence of citizen action

It is no accident that Common Cause was launched in 1970. The time was ripe. Future historians may remember the 1970s as the decade when citizen action emerged as a revitalizing force in American society. If so, they will not report it as a new thing but as a familiar ingredient in American life that matured and came into its own.

They will note that, in the decades preceding the emergence, the American people had ignored their duties as citizens. They had allowed their instruments of self- government to fall into disrepair. They had allowed themselves to be smothered by large-scale organization and technology and

-576-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Is America Necessary? Conservative, Liberal, & Socialist Perspectives of United States Political Institutions
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Preface ix
  • Contents xi
  • Introduction 1
  • Part One 15
  • 1 - Where Do I Stand? 17
  • Conservative 21
  • Conclusion 28
  • Socialist 44
  • Notes 46
  • Part Two 57
  • 2 - The Presidency 61
  • Conservative 67
  • Socialist 79
  • Notes 85
  • 3 - The Pentagon 101
  • Conservative 107
  • Socialist 117
  • 4 - The Secret Police 133
  • Conservative 139
  • Socialist 152
  • Notes 160
  • Part Three 167
  • 5 - Elite Clubs and Associations 169
  • Conservative 173
  • Notes 184
  • Notes 192
  • 6 - Multinational Corporations 209
  • Conservative 213
  • Socialist 221
  • Notes 244
  • 7 - Organized Crime 257
  • Conservative 259
  • Socialist 264
  • Part Four 283
  • 8 - Congress 285
  • Conservative 289
  • Socialist 296
  • Notes 303
  • 9 - The Courts 315
  • Conservative 319
  • Socialist 330
  • Notes 337
  • 10 - Regulatory Agencies 347
  • Conservative 349
  • Socialist 361
  • Notes 369
  • Political Parties 385
  • Conservative 387
  • Liberal 396
  • Conclusion 410
  • 12 - Academia 413
  • Conservative 416
  • References 427
  • Notes 434
  • Part Five 449
  • 13 - The Media 451
  • Conservative 453
  • Liberal 467
  • Notes 474
  • 14 - Banks 483
  • Conservative The Great Banking Retreat. 485
  • Socialist 489
  • Notes 497
  • 15 - Unions 511
  • Conservative 513
  • Notes 519
  • A Critical Issue 537
  • 16 - The Economic Crisis 539
  • Conservative 542
  • Socialist 544
  • Notes 550
  • Part Seven 557
  • 17 - Political Programs 567
  • Louis Banks. the Mission Of Our Business Society. 568
  • Ralph Nader and Donald Ross. Toward an Initiatory Democracy. 576
  • Stanley Aronowitz. On Organization: A Good Party Is Hard to Find. 581
  • Mass Parties and Reformism 587
  • Notes 596
  • Fred R. Harris. Up With Those Who'Re Down. 602
  • Part Eight 613
  • Appendix 621
  • Note 644
  • Index 649
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 658

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.