Early Netherlandish Painting: From Van Eyck to Bruegel

By Max J. Friedlænder | Go to book overview

JAN VAN SCOREL

THE opinions of the sixteenth century are unanimous on Jan van Scorel and proclaim his fame loudly and--the reasons for this fame. On the other hand, the judgment in more recent literature is full of doubt and criticism, because the value of his achievements, admired by his contemporaries, has now become questionable. So unbounded is our admiration for Netherlandish painting that Scorel's determined and conscious turning away from tradition seems at first sight to be a dangerous uprooting. In quite recent times, it is true, there is a dawning tendency to recognize the positive side of the Rome pilgrim's achievement--as we can see in Grete Ring's article.1 The growing scientific spirit widens our susceptibilities in all directions. Increasing insight throws ever greater light on the necessity of change, and every result demands recognition. It may well be that behind this objectivity lurks the subjectivity of modern taste for which Scorel's mannerism has lost its horror. When the Obervellach altarpiece first became known, some forty years ago, this work, painted before the Fall of Man, was immediately placed far higher than all Scorel's later achievements. And since few people were able to examine this out-of-the-way triptych the bias in its favour was retained in the compilatory literature. The motive for Grete Ring's criticism of the early work was the desire to get rid of the foolish idea that on Italian soil the master had exchanged inherited values of priceless worth for a phantom. In reality, the style of the Obervellach altarpiece is discordant and on the verge of disintegration. One can sense the inner void and the readiness to receive fresh ideals.

Jan van Scorel was born on August 1, 1495, in the village of Schoorel near Alkmaar. His first teacher was Willem Cornelisz (more correctly Cornelis Willemsz), an unknown Haarlem painter,2 and later he went to Amsterdam to Jacob Cornelisz. Restlessness and dissatisfaction with mere craftsmanship drove him to Jan Gossaert, who at that time--c. 1515-- was at Utrecht and was looked upon, thanks to his Italian experience, as the great innovator. Subsequently, Scorel was lured southwards by his love of travelling and his thirst for new experience and knowledge, to

____________________
1
Kunstchronik, 17 May, 1918.
2
Before he went to Willem Cornelisz he may have been apprenticed to Cornelis Buys at Alkmaar, cf. Friedländer, Die Altniederländische Malerei, XII, 1935, p. 119.

-126-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Early Netherlandish Painting: From Van Eyck to Bruegel
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Introduction v
  • Contents viii
  • The Geography of Netherlandish Art 1
  • Jan Van Eyck 6
  • Petrus Christus 14
  • Rogier Van Der Weyden 16
  • Dieric Bouts 26
  • Hugo Van Der Goes 32
  • Hans Memlinc 41
  • Gerard David 48
  • Geertgen Tot Sint Jans 53
  • Jerome Bosch 56
  • General Remarks on the Sixteenth Century 64
  • Quentin Massys 68
  • Joachim De Patenier 76
  • Joos Van Cleve 85
  • Jan Provost 91
  • Jan Gossaert 95
  • Jan Joest 105
  • Jan Mostaert 111
  • Lucas Van Leyden 119
  • Jan Van Scorel 126
  • Pieter Bruegel 133
  • Note on This Edition 415
  • Acknowledgements 417
  • List of Plates 419
  • Contents 422
  • Index of Places 423
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 430

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.