America's Renewable Resources: Historical Trends and Current Challenges

By Kenneth D. Frederick; Roger A. Sedjo | Go to book overview

Tables
1-1 Major Uses of the Land in the United States, 198212
2-1 Average Annual Precipitation and Runoff, by State25
2-2 Variability of Annual Streamflow: Low and High Flows as a Percentage of Mean Annual Flow for Eighteen Water Resource Regions26
2-3 Degree to Which the Quality of U.S. Rivers, Lakes, and Estuaries Support Their Designated Uses60
2-4 Primary Pollution Sources in the Nation's Water Resources that Failed to Fully Support Their Designated Uses, as of 198661
2-A1 Estimated Water Use in the United States, 1900-195872
2-A2 Dams Constructed in the United States, 1700-198272
2-A3 Major Purposes of Dams Constructed, Before 1900 to 198272
2-A4 Estimated Water Use in the United States, 1950-198573
2-A5 Irrigated Land in Farms, by Farm Production Region, 1939-198273
2-A6 Groundwater and Surface Water Withdrawn for Western Irrigation, 1950-198574
3-1 New England's Growing Forest109
4-1 Percentage of Rangeland Acreage in Depletion Classes, by Ownership, 1935143
4-2 Trends in Range Forage Depletion, 1905-1935143
4-3 Percentage of Rangeland Acreage Depletion by Condition Class, 1961, 1966, and 1972144
4-4 Range Condition Depletion by Condition Class, 1975144
4-5 Erosion on Bureau of Land Management Land by Condition Class, 1975145
4-6 Trends in Range Condition on Bureau of Land Management Land, 1975145
4-7 Percentage of Nonfederal Range Acreage by Condition Class, 1977145
4-8 Percentage of Nonfederal Range Acreage by Condition Class, 1982146
4-9 Percentage of Bureau of Land Management Range Acreage by Condition Class, 1984-1987146
4-10 Percentage of Bureau of Land Management Range Acreage in Three Condition Classes, Various Years, 1936-1987147
4-11 Summary of Range Conditions and Trends for Public and Private Land, 1989149
4-12 Percentage of Respondents Giving Positive and Negative Assessments of Public Land Range Condition, by Interest Group, 1975152
4-A1 Major Uses of Land in the Contiguous Forty-eight States, 1880-1982162
5-1 Cropland Used for Crops and Idle in the Contiguous United States, 1850-1910, and land in Farms, 1880-1910170
5-2 Various Measures of Agricultural Output, 1870-1910173
5-3 Measures of the Productivity of Cropland and Shares of Main Crops in Total Cropland, 1870-1910173
5-4 Prices of Corn, Wheat, and Cotton, 1870-1910, Expressed in 1967 Dollars174
5-5 Amounts of Farmland and Cropland, 1910-1940177
5-6 Percentage Distribution of the Nation's Cropland Among Ten USDA-Designated Producing Regions183
5-7 Several Measures of Agricultural Land Use, 1940-1987184
5-8 Percentage Distribution of Cropland Used for Crops Among Ten USDA-Designated Producing Regions185

-x-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
America's Renewable Resources: Historical Trends and Current Challenges
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Esources for the Future v
  • Contents vii
  • Tables x
  • Figures xi
  • Preface xiii
  • 1: Overview: Renewable Resource Trends 1
  • References 21
  • 2: Water Resources: Increasing Demand and Scarce Supplies 23
  • Notes 71
  • Appendix 2 72
  • References 75
  • 3: Forest Resources: Resilient and Serviceable 81
  • Notes 115
  • Appendix 116
  • References 118
  • 4: Rangeland Resources: Changing Uses and Productivity 123
  • Notes 161
  • Appendix 4 162
  • References 163
  • 5: Cropland and Soils: Past Performance and Policy Challenges 169
  • References 203
  • 6: Wildlife: Severe Decline and Partial Recovery 205
  • Notes 241
  • Appendix 6 242
  • References 245
  • 7: The Growing Role of Outdoor Recreation 249
  • Notes 279
  • Appendix 280
  • References 281
  • About the Authors 283
  • Photo Credits 284
  • Index 285
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 296

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.