America's Renewable Resources: Historical Trends and Current Challenges

By Kenneth D. Frederick; Roger A. Sedjo | Go to book overview

Appendix 2

Table 2-A1. Estimated Water Use in the United States, 1900-1958
Purpose Water use (billions of gallons per day)
1900 1910 1920 1930 1940 1945 1950 1958
Irrigationa 20.2 39.0 55.9 60.2 71.0 83.1 100.0 127.5
Public supply 3.0 4.7 6.0 8.0 10.1 12.0 14.1 19.7
Rural domestic and livestock 2.0 2.2 2.4 2.9 3.1 3.1 4.6 5.8
Other industrialb 10.0 14.0 18.0 21.0 29.0 41.0 38.1 56.4
Thermoelectric power 5.0 6.5 9.2 18.4 23.2 31.2 45.9 89.9
Total offstream water use 40.2 66.4 91.5 110.5 136.4 170.4 202.7 299.3
Source of water
Ground 7.3 11.7 15.8 18.2 22.6 28.3 35.2 54.0
Surface 32.9 54.7 75.7 92.3 113.8 142.2 167.5 245.3
Source: Picton ( 1960).
aTotal withdrawals including delivery losses.
bManufacturing and mineral industries, rural commercial,air conditioning,
resorts, hotels, military and other state and federal agencies, and other mis-
cellaneous uses.

Table 2-A2. Dams Completed in the United States, 1700-1982
Average increases Cumulative total by
end of period
Period Number
of dams
Storage
capacity of dams
(maf)
Dams per year Storage
capacity per dam
(1,000 acre-feet)
Dams Storage capacity
Dams (maf)
1700-1899 2,661 10 -- 4 2,661 10
1900-1920 4,734 43 225 9 7,395 52
1921-1932 2,786 81 232 29 10,181 133
1933-1944 5,135 146 428 28 15,316 279
1945-1969 35,273 474 1,411 13 50,589 753
1970-1982a 12,830 117 1,069 9 63,419 869
Source: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers ( 1982).
Note: Table represents only dams at least 6 feet high with at least 25 acre-
feet of storage, or at least 25 feet in height with at least 15 acre-feet of
storage. Rows may not add because of rounding.
aThe 1982 numbers include only one dam with a storage of 85 acre-feet.
Consequently, the annual averages for the 1970-1982 period are based on
12 years.

Table 2-A3. Major Purposes of Dams Constructed, Before 1900 to 1982
Major purpose of dams
(percentage of total)
Period Total number
of dams constructed
Irrigation Hydroelectric Flood
control
Water
Supply
Recreationa Navigation Stock
or farm pond
Before 1900 2,661 11 5 2 19 48 1 3
1900-1920 4,734 25 9 2 18 35 1 3
1921-1932 2,786 16 11 2 20 40b 6
1933-1944 5,135 12 3 3 17 37 1 21
1945-1969 35,273 9 1 18 11 34 ___b 20
1970-1982 12,830 8 __b 22 6 30 __b 22
Total 1700-1982 63,419 11 2 15 12 35 __b 18
Source: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers ( 1982).
Note: Table includes only dams at least 6 feet high with at least 25 acre-
feet of storage, or at least 25 feet high with at least 15 acre-feet of storage.
aThe relative importance recreational of dams is overstated by the per-
centages of dams because most of these dams are relatively small.
bDenotes less than 0.5 percent.

-72-

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America's Renewable Resources: Historical Trends and Current Challenges
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Esources for the Future v
  • Contents vii
  • Tables x
  • Figures xi
  • Preface xiii
  • 1: Overview: Renewable Resource Trends 1
  • References 21
  • 2: Water Resources: Increasing Demand and Scarce Supplies 23
  • Notes 71
  • Appendix 2 72
  • References 75
  • 3: Forest Resources: Resilient and Serviceable 81
  • Notes 115
  • Appendix 116
  • References 118
  • 4: Rangeland Resources: Changing Uses and Productivity 123
  • Notes 161
  • Appendix 4 162
  • References 163
  • 5: Cropland and Soils: Past Performance and Policy Challenges 169
  • References 203
  • 6: Wildlife: Severe Decline and Partial Recovery 205
  • Notes 241
  • Appendix 6 242
  • References 245
  • 7: The Growing Role of Outdoor Recreation 249
  • Notes 279
  • Appendix 280
  • References 281
  • About the Authors 283
  • Photo Credits 284
  • Index 285
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