The Life of Horace Greeley, Editor of the New York Tribune

By J. Parton | Go to book overview

said nothing, but was occasionally roused to most vehement argument; a man much given to reading and cold-water baths.

In the beginning of the year 1834, the dream of editorship revived in the soul of Horace Greeley. A project for starting a weekly paper began to be agitated in the office. The firm, which then consisted of three members, H. Greeley, Jonas Winchester, and E. Sibbett, considered itself worth three thousand dollars, and was further of opinion, that it contained within itself an amount of editorial talent sufficient to originate and conduct a family paper superior to any then existing. The firm was correct in both opinions, and the result was--the NEW YORKER.

An incident connected with the job office of Greeley & Co. is, perhaps, worth mentioning here. One James Gordon Bennett, a person then well known as a smart writer for the press, came to Horace Greeley, and exhibiting a fifty-dollar bill and some other notes of smaller denomination as his cash capital, invited him to join in setting up a new daily paper, the New York Herald. Our hero declined the offer, but recommended James Gordon to apply to another printer, naming one, who he thought would like to share in such an enterprise. To him the editor of the Herald did apply, and with success. The Herald appeared soon after, under the joint proprietorship of Bennett and the printer alluded to. Upon the subsequent burning of the Herald office, the partners separated, and the Herald was thenceforth conducted by Bennett alone.


CHAPTER XII.
EDITOR OF THE NEW YORKER.

Character of the Paper--Its Early Fortunes--Happiness of the Editor--Scene in the Of-
fice--Specimens of Horace Greeley's Poetry--Subjects of his Essays--His Opinions
then--His Marriage--The Silk-stocking Story--A day in Washington--His impress-
ions of the Senate--Pecuniary difficulties--Causes of the New-Yorker's ill-success
as a Business--The missing letters--The Editor gets a nickname--The Agonies
of a Debtor--Park Benjamin--Henry J. Raymond.

LUCKILY for the purposes of the present writer, Mr. Greeley is the most autobiographical of editors. He takes his readers into his

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