The Life of Horace Greeley, Editor of the New York Tribune

By J. Parton | Go to book overview

subject occasionally, but only in reply to those who sought to make political or personal capital by reviving it. By its discussion of the subject it rendered a great service to the country: first, by affording one more proof that, for the ills that flesh is heir to, there is, there can be, no panacea; secondly, by exhibiting the economy of association, and familiarizing the public mind with the idea of association--an idea susceptible of a thousand applications, and capable, in a thousand ways, of alleviating and preventing human woes. We see its perfect triumph in Insurance, whereby a loss which would crush an individual falls upon the whole company of insurers, lightly and unperceived. Future ages will witness its successful application to most of the affairs of life.


CHAPTER XVII.
THE TRIBUNE'S SECOND YEAR.

Increase of price--The Tribune offends the Sixth Ward fighting-men--The office threatened--Novel preparations for defense--Charles Dickens defended--The Editor travels--Visits Washington, and sketches the Senators--At Mount Vernon--At Niagara--A hard bit at Major Noah.

THE Tribune, as we have seen, was started as a penny paper. It began its second volume, on the eleventh of April, 1842, at the increased price of nine cents a week, or two cents for a single number, and effected this serious advance without losing two hundred of its twelve thousand subscribers. At the same time, Messrs. Greeley and McElrath started the 'American Laborer,' a monthly magazine, devoted chiefly to the advocacy of Protection. It was published at seventy-five cents for the twelve numbers which the prospectus announced.

When it was remarked, a few pages back, that the word with the Tribune was FIGHT, no allusion was intended to the use of carnal weapons. "The pen is mightier than the sword," claptraps Bulwer in one of his plays; and the Pen was the only fighting implement

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