Chapter III
FLEET STREET AND SO TO WHITEHALL

I always make a note of the occasions on which I descend or ascend into pure journalism -- viz. laying down of strong views on a subject which doesn't matter and about which I care little and know less.

Letter to my mother, March 21, 1907.

M Y appointment to the Morning Post coincided with another change of activities. In the letter reporting to my mother Lord Glenesk's approval of one of my first leaders, I told her of a second event "eminently satisfactory to your son."

November 20, 1905.

I have just been co-opted a member of the Central Body for dealing with the Unemployed throughout London. Moreover I have been co-opted at the head of the poll with W. Crooks (the Labour Member for Woolwich) and above the Mayor of Westminster (Lord Cheylesmore), the late Chief Registrar of Friendly Societies ( Sir E. Brabrook), Keir Hardie, M.P. and various other reverend seniors. This result is due to the fact that I was put forward I believe both by the C.O.S. and the Socialists!

Through this co-option I returned to practical dealing with the unemployed. I continued at the same time to study the problem of unemployment and to prepare, largely in alliance with Sidney and Beatrice Webb, an assault on the authorities able to promote fundamental treatment of the problem; as it was this that led to my next move, from Fleet Street to Whitehall, it is dealt with near the end of this chapter. Meanwhile I found in the Morning Post, not only means of earning my living while keeping the day free for myself, but occasion for commenting on all the social problems of the time and seeking to promote social reform in many fields. The present chapter falls into several sections. There is the new Morning Post of Fabian Ware; the Central Unemployed Body for London; the Social Problems of 1905-14 as reflected in the Morning Post; the Campaign for Security by Social Insurance; the Campaign for Labour Exchanges; and at the end a Question for Reformers.

-39-

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