Epilogue
The New Climates of the World

The choice is no longer between Utopia and the pleasant ordered world that our fathers knew. The choice is between Utopia and Hell.

Address in Hall of University College, Oxford,

November 11, 1939.1

M Y active life did not end at the age of sixty-six, with the defeat of my political adventure and the loss of all my paid employments -- as Master of University College, Oxford, as Chairman of the Unemployment Insurance Statutory Committee, in regular writing for papers. I found myself, in place of these employments, returning to earlier interests and experiences.

I nearly returned to India -- the land of my birth and early childhood -- at the end of 1945 to advise on social insurance. When that project had to be abandoned, I returned to India and to my trade of author together by writing an account of my parents' time there, under the title India Called Them; I still receive letters from people who knew and valued my father's record from 1857 to 1892 as a friend of Indian self-government before such friendship was fashionable, and from the children of some who went to the school for Indian women which my mother began in 1873.

I nearly went to the United States again, for a lecture tour at the end of 1945. When that project failed, I visited many other countries that I had known before and some new ones. I saw Germany under occupation several times, and wrote about my experiences in the Press and in pamphlets.2 I visited each of the north-western countries of Europe -- Belgium, Holland, Denmark, Norway, Sweden and Finland, all except the last on more than one occasion -- partly to talk and still more to listen. I broke new ground in visiting Spain in March 1946. I went round the world with J. in 1948 and we wrote our first books together: Antipodes Notebook and On and Off the Platform Under the Southern Cross. New Zealand for both of us was new ground. Australia I had not visited since 1882 when I was taken there as a child of three to see some cousins. By 1948 the cousins, descended from my great-grandmother on the father's

____________________
1
The phrase is printed in Peace by Federation, a Federal Union pamphlet published in April 1940, and with slight differences in The Price of Peace, p. 87 ( Pilot Press, 1945).
2
See An Urgent Message from Germany, 1946.

-355-

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