Appendix A
Documents, Letters and Notes

1. SIC VOS NON VOBIS (see Prologue, p. 3)

The story goes that once, when the poet Virgil had written a distich in praise of Augustus and put it up on the palace door another poet took the credit for it. So Virgil chalked up on the door four times the first half of a pentameter line Sic Vos Non Vobis and Augustus asked all the court poets to show their skill by completing the lines. No one else could complete them and Virgil did so as follows:

Sic vos non vobis nidificatis aves,
" " " vellera fertis oves,
" " " mellificatis apes,
" " " fertis aratra boves.
So you not for yourselvesbuild nests, O birds!
" " "bear fleeces, O sheep!
" " "make honey, O bees!
" " "draw ploughs, O bulls!

2. MORNING POST LEADERS AND ARTICLES 1906-07

(a) WELCOME TO LABOUR PARTY

Leader of February 1, 1906 (see Ch. III, p. 51)

As the most outstanding feature of a remarkable election, the "coming of Labour" has already received a full measure of attention. Yet throughout the inharmonious chorus of alarm and of approbation which has greeted the new apparition, one note has hardly been sounded with sufficient clearness. There is yet one point which we may emphasise to some purpose. The Labour Party, like all other human institutions, may be trusted to disappoint the expectations both of its extreme opponents and of those who have welcomed it most enthusiastically. It will neither destroy the State nor save the State at a blow. Destruction is not the work of the hard-headed officials of enormous industrial corporations who, popular imagination notwithstanding, will be the typical Labour leaders of today and of tomorrow. Salvation comes not of parties but of policies; and the Labour Party necessarily and deliberately declines for the present to formulate a general policy. Yet, in spite of this negative

-365-

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