George Eliot's Life as Related in Her Letters and Journals - Vol. 3

By George Eliot; J. W. Cross | Go to book overview

made a few alterations of an unimportant kind--the printing being unusually correct--it would be well for me to send this copy to be printed from. I think it must be nearly ten years since I read the book before, but there is no book of mine about which I more thoroughly feel that I could swear by every sentence as having been written with my best blood, such as it is, and with the most ardent care for veracity of which my nature is capable. It has made me often sob with a sort of painful joy as I have read the sentences which had faded from my memory. This helps one to bear false representations with patience; for I really don't love any gentleman who undertakes to state my opinions well enough to desire that I should find myself all wrong in order to justify his statement.

Letter to John Blackwood, 30th Jan. 1877.

I wish, whenever it is expedient, to add "The Lifted Veil" and "Brother Jacob," and so fatten the volume containing "Silas Marner," which would thus become about 100 pages thicker.

Mr. Lewes feels himself innocent of dialect in general, and of Midland dialect in especial. Hence I presume to take your reference on the subject as if it had been addressed to me. I was born and bred in Warwickshire, and heard the Leicestershire, North Staffordshire, and Derbyshire dialects during visits made in my childhood and youth. These last are represented (mildly) in "Adam Bede." The Warwickshire talk is broader, and has characteristics which it shares with other Mercian districts. Moreover, dialect, like other living things, tends to become mongrel, especially in a central, fertile, and manufacturing region, attractive of migration; and hence the Midland talk presents less interesting relics of elder grammar than the more northerly dialects.

Letter to William Allingham, 8th March, 1877.

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George Eliot's Life as Related in Her Letters and Journals - Vol. 3
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Niagara University Library *
  • Title Page v
  • Contents vi
  • Illustrations to Vol. Iii. ix
  • Chapter XIV 1
  • Summary. January, 1867, to December, 1867. 22
  • Chapter XV 24
  • Summary. January, 1969, to December, 1868. 53
  • Chapter XVI 55
  • Summary. January, 1869, to December, 1872. 135
  • Chapter XVII 138
  • Summary. 194
  • Chapter XVIII 197
  • Summary. 247
  • Chapter XIX 249
  • Index. 317
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