Anecdotes and Traditions: Illustrative of Early English History and Literature, Derived from Ms. Sources

By William J. Thoms | Go to book overview

NOTICES OF SIR NICHOLAS LESTRANGE, BART. AND HIS FAMILY CONNEXIONS.

COMMUNICATEd BY J. G. NICHOLS, ESQ. F. S A.

THE person who now makes his first appearance as a posthumous author, after a lapse of nearly two centuries from the days in which he lived, is one for whose biography the apparent materials are exceedingly scanty, and whose mere existence as a country gentleman of Norfolk is almost all that is recorded. It requires, indeed, a little research before the reader of the Merry Passages and Jests," now the MS. Harl. 6395, can satisfy himself of the identity of their collector; for the book contains no contemporary statement that directly specifies his name. But in the course of the volume, and particularly in the catalogue at the end, which gives the authorities from whom the anecdotes were derived, he mentions so many of his relatives, that at length it is fully ascertained that the writer was no other than Sir Nicholas Lestrange, the first Baronet of Hunstanton; the elder brother of a person of considerable reputa tion at the latter part of the 17th century, in what is now called periodical literature, -- that voluminous essayist and political pamphleteer, Sir Roger Lestrange.

Having arrived at this conclusion, we find that several of the anec dotes which are given on the writer's own knowledge, are marked S. N. L. -- the first letter being the initial of his title of knighthood, a

-xi-

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Anecdotes and Traditions: Illustrative of Early English History and Literature, Derived from Ms. Sources
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Preface. v
  • Notices of Sir Nicholas Lestrange, Bart. and His Family Connexions. xi
  • Part I. 1
  • Part Ii. 80
  • Part Iii. 117
  • L'Envoy. 127
  • Index 129
  • Laws of the Camden Society, Adopted at the General Meeting, May 2, 1839. 12
  • Members of the Camden Society, for the Year Ending 2nd May, 1839. 15
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