Anecdotes and Traditions: Illustrative of Early English History and Literature, Derived from Ms. Sources

By William J. Thoms | Go to book overview

ANECDOTES AND TRADITIONS.

PART I.

NO. I. -- SIR DRUB DRURY's PENMANSHIP.

SIR DRUB DRURY being an ill scribe, having writt a thing very ill, Sir Robert Bell checkt him thus:--"Fie, Drue, pr'y-the write so that a man may be saved by the reading on't however."

L'Estrange, No. 2. My Father.

The allusion here made is to the reading, by which criminals proved themselves entitled to the benefit of clergy. The passage actually read upon those occasions is a subject of some doubt; or perhaps the custom differed in various places. The first verse of the 51st Psalm, "miserere mei," &c. was often selected, and from that circumstance acquired the name of the neck verse. See a note by Sir Walter Scott to Canto I. of the "Lay of the Last Minstrel." Barrington, however, in his "Observations on the Statutes", p. 350, states, on the authority of Lord Bacon, that the Bishop was to prepare the book, and the Judge was to turn to what part he should think proper.

At present no one can claim the benefit of clergy; it is entirely abolished by the Act 7 and 8 Geo. IV. c. 28, and every one guilty of felony, whether peer or commoner, layman or spiritual, learned or unlearned, gentle or simple, is made liable to the same punishment.

NO. II. -- LADY HOBART'S GRACE.

The Lady Hobart, every one being sett at the table and no body blessing it, but gazing one upon an other, in expectation who should CAMD. soc. 5.

-1-

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Anecdotes and Traditions: Illustrative of Early English History and Literature, Derived from Ms. Sources
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Preface. v
  • Notices of Sir Nicholas Lestrange, Bart. and His Family Connexions. xi
  • Part I. 1
  • Part Ii. 80
  • Part Iii. 117
  • L'Envoy. 127
  • Index 129
  • Laws of the Camden Society, Adopted at the General Meeting, May 2, 1839. 12
  • Members of the Camden Society, for the Year Ending 2nd May, 1839. 15
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