Land Use Information: A Critical Survey of U.S. Statistics Including Possibilities for Greater Uniformity

By Marion Clawson; Charles L. Stewart et al. | Go to book overview

APPENDIX A.
Some Historical
Materials on Land Use Data1

DEVELOPMENTS AFFECTING LAND USE INFORMATION NEEDS AND
AVAILABILITY: SOME IMPORTANT DATES IN UNITED STATES LAND HISTORY
Prior
to Tax assessments in various provincial and state areas varied according
1785 to observed quality grades of land, as improved and located (see below).
1785 Land Ordinance established rectangular system of cadastral surveys of
public land in Northwest Territory (north of the Ohio River). Field notes
in first public domain survey shows surveyor's observations of land
quality differences.
1790 First census of population.
1792 Virginia builds turnpike, Alexandria to Shenandoah Valley, this year
and next. Philadelphia and Lancaster turnpike chartered, turnpike era
extending to 1820.
1796 Act of Congress provided for administration, survey, and sale of public
lands in central part of Northwest Territory, surveyors being required
to describe the nature of soil, water, vegetation, etc. Salt springs and
salt waters were designated to be reserved by the federal government.
1802 Cumberland Road authorized for construction between Potomac and
Ohio Rivers; completed in 1818. Various arterial transportation routes
and local land use roads developed by federal and local action.
1807 Lead mines on public lands first leased by the federal government to
private enterprises. This policy was continued for about forty years.
1810 First census of manufacturers.
1812 General Land Office established in the Treasury Department.
1828 Senate resolution required land offices to estimate relative acreages of
various classes of public lands not yet sold.
1829 First steam locomotive used in America, on railroad from Carbondale
to Honesdale, Pennsylvania.
1832 Hot Springs area in Arkansas was set aside by the Congress. In 1921, the
Hot Springs National Park was created.
1840 First census of agriculture and mineral industries.
1841 The Preemption Act.
____________________
1
This appendix was prepared for this study by Charles L. Stewart.

-181-

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