The Pattern of Asia

By John E. Brush; Norton S. Ginsburg | Go to book overview

xiv
Mongolian People's Republic

THERE ARE MANY WAYS OF LOOKING AT " MONGOLIA": (1) AS THE great physical region called the Mongolian plateau; (2) as the area in which Mongol ethnic groups and culture predominate; and (3) as the political divisions known as Inner and Outer Mongolia in which Chinese and Soviet political control respectively are dominant. Physical Mongolia changes little; ethnic Mongolia changes relatively slowly; but political Mongolia reflects more rapid rates of change. The political organization of Inner Mongolia has undergone significant revison under Chinese communist control in terms of both administrative area and administrative structure. This chapter, however, is limited to the northern portion of the Mongolian plateau occupied mainly by the Khalkha tribe of Mongols. The area has long been known as Outer Mongolia, organized politically in 1921 as the Russian-supported Mongolian Peoples Republic (MPR).

Encompassing an area of over 600,000 square miles, Outer Mongolia stretches 1,400 miles from east to west and has a latitudinal spread of generally 300 to 500 miles. Its continental situation is emphasized by its great distance from the sea. To the west, 4,000 miles away, is the Atlantic. The Indian Ocean lies 1,500 miles to the south. In the north lies a 1,000 mile-wide strip of Soviet Siberia. The arm of the Yellow Sea, the Gulf ofChih-li

-274-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Upgrade your membership to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Pattern of Asia
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents ix
  • Contents xi
  • Maps xiii
  • I - Asia The Physical Basis 1
  • II - Asian Asia Patterns and Problems 21
  • III - East Asia An Introduction 46
  • V - Japan Agriculture and Food Supply 86
  • VI - Japan Industry and Commerce 108
  • VII - Korea 130
  • VIII - China Physical Diversity 155
  • IX - China Agriculture and Food Supply 168
  • X - China The North and Far West 190
  • XI - China The South 213
  • XII - China Industry and Commerce 239
  • XIII - China Political Organization, Population, And Prospects 258
  • XIV - Mongolian People's Republic 274
  • XV - Southeast Asia An Introduction 290
  • Selected Geographical Bibliography 321
  • XVII - Indonesia 344
  • XVIII - Malaya and British Borneo 370
  • XIX - Thailand 391
  • XX - Indochina The Two Viet, Cambodia, and Laos 410
  • XXI - Burma 440
  • XXII - South Asia Peoples and Cultures 458
  • XXIII - South Asia The Physical Basis of Life 483
  • XXIV - South Asia Political Organization 523
  • XXV - Northern India and The Himalayan Countries 558
  • XXVI - South India 596
  • XXVII - Pakistan 632
  • XXVIII - Ceylon 663
  • XXIX - Afghanistan 679
  • XXX - Southwest Asia An Introduction 698
  • XXXI - South Asia Economic Patterns 716
  • XXXII - Southwest Asia Regional Problems 733
  • XXXIII - Turkey 745
  • XXXIV - Iran 767
  • XXXV - The Fertile Crescent, I Israel Ande Lebanon 790
  • XXXVI - The Fertile Crescent, II Syria, Jordan, Iraq 811
  • XXVII - The Arabian Peninsula 831
  • XXXVIII - Russia and Asia 845
  • XXXIX - Soviet Asia 873
  • Index 909
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved in your active project from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 932

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Upgrade your membership to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.