The Works of Frederick Schiller: Early Dramas and Romances

By Friedrich Schiller; Henry G. Bohn | Go to book overview

AMELIA (with a sudden cry). Dead! both dead! [Exit in despair.

Enter FRANCIS, dancing with joy.

FRANCIS. DEAD, they cry, DEAD! NOW am I MASTER. Through the whole castle it rings, DEAD!--but stay, perchance he only SLEEPS?--To be sure, yes, to be sure! that certainly is a sleep after which no 'good morrow' is ever said.--Sleep and death are but twin brothers. We will for once change their names!--Excellent, welcome sleep! We will call thee death! (He closes the eyes of OLD MOOR.) Who now will come forward and dare to accuse me at the bar of justice, or tell me to my face, Thou art a VILLAIN?--Away, then, with this troublesome mask of humility and virtue! Now you shall see Francis as he is, and tremble! My father was over- gentle in his demands; turned his domain into a family circle; sat blandly smiling at the gate, and saluted his peasants as brethren and children.--My brows shall lour upon you like thunderclouds; my lordly name shall hover over you like a threatening comet over the mountains; my forehead shall be your weather-glass!--He would caress and fondle the child that lifted its stubborn head against him. But fondling and caressing is not my mode. I will drive the rowels of the spur into their flesh, and give the scourge a trial.--Under my rule it shall be brought to pass, that potatoes and small beer shall be considered a holiday treat; and woe to him who meets my eye with the audacious front of health.-- Haggard want, and crouching fear, are my insignia; and in this livery will I clothe ye. [Exit.


SCENE III.--THE BOHEMIAN WOODS.

SPIEGELBERG, RAZMAN, a troop of R0BBERS.

RAZ. Are you come? Is it really you? Oh, let me ueeze thee into a jelly, my dear heart's brother! Welcome to the Bohemian forests! Why, you are grown quite stout and jolly! You have brought us recruits in right earnest, a little army of them; you are the very prince of crimps.

SPIEGEL. Eh, brother? Eh? And proper fellows they are!--You must confess the blessing of heaven is visibly upon me; I was a poor, hungry wretch, and had nothing but this staff when I went over the Jordan, and now there

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