The Works of Frederick Schiller, Early Dramas and Romances: The Robbers, Fiesco, Love and Intrigue, Demetrius, the Ghost-Seer, and the Sport of Destiny

By Friedrich Schiller; Henry G. Bohn | Go to book overview

SCENE III.--Another Room in the Castle.

CHARLES VON MOORenters from one side, DANIEL front the other.

CHARLES (hastily). Where is Lady Amelia?

DANIEL. Honoured sir! permit an old man to ask you a favour.

CHARLES. It is granted. What is it you ask?

DANIEL. Not much, and yet all--but little, and yet a great deal.--Suffer me to kiss your hand!

CHARLES. That I cannot permit, good old man (embraces him), from one whom I should like to call my father.

DANIEL. Your hand, your hand! I beseech you.

CHARLES. That must not be.

DANIEL It must! (He takes hold of it, surveys it quickly. and falls down before him.) Dear, dearest Charles!

CHARLES (startled; he composes himself, and says in a distant tone). What mean you, my friend? I don't understand you.

DANIEL. Yes, you may deny it, you may dissemble as much as you please!--'Tis very well! very well.--For all that you are my dearest, my excellent young master.--Good Heaven! that I, poor old man, should live to have the joy-- what a stupid blockhead was I that I did not at a glance--oh, gracious powers! And you are really come back, and the dear old master is underground, and here you are again!-- What a purblind dolt I was to be sure! (striking his forehead) that I did not on the instant--Oh, dear me!--who could have dreamt it!--What I have so often prayed for with tears--Oh, mercy me!--There he stands again, as large as life, in the old room!

CHARLES. What's all this oration about? Are you in a fit of delirium, and have escaped from your keepers; or are you rehearsing a stage player's part with me?

DANIEL. Oh, fie! fie!--It is not pretty of you to make game of an old servant.--That scar!--Eh! do you remember it ?--Good Heaven! what a fright you put me into--I always loved you so dearly; and what misery you might have brought upon me--You were sitting in my lap--do you remember?-- there, in the round chamber.--Has all that quite vanished from your memory--and the cuckoo too, that you were so fond

-87-

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