The Works of Frederick Schiller, Early Dramas and Romances: The Robbers, Fiesco, Love and Intrigue, Demetrius, the Ghost-Seer, and the Sport of Destiny

By Henry G. Bohn; Friedrich Schiller | Go to book overview

May oblivion shroud thy misdeed for ever, and death not bring 't back to light.

Enter KOSINSKY.

KOSINSKY. The horses are ready saddled, you can mount as soon as you please.

CHARLES. Why in such haste? Why so urgent? Shall I see her no more?

KOSINSKY. I will take off the bridles again, if you wish it; you bade me hasten head over heels.

CHARLES. One more farewell! one more! I must drain this poisoned cup of happiness to the dregs, and then--Stay, Kosinsky! Ten minutes more--behind, in the castle yard-- and we gallop off.


SCENE IV.--In the Garden.

AMELIA. "You are in tears, Amelia?"--These were his very words--and spoken with such expression--such a voice! --oh, it summoned up a thousand dear remembrances!--scenes of past delight, as in my youthful days of happiness, my golden spring-tide of love.--The nightingale sung again with the same sweetness, the flowers breathed the same delicious fragrance, as when I used to hang enraptured on his neck*-- Ha! false, perfidious heart! And dost thou seek thus artfully to veil thy perjury?--No, no! begone for ever from my soul, thou sinful image!--I have not broken my oath, thou only one! Avaunt, from my soul, ye treacherous, impious wishes! In the heart where Charles reigns, no son of earth may dwell.--But why, my soul, dost thou thus constantly, thus obstinately turn towards this stranger? Does he not cling to my heart in the very image of my only one? Is he not his inseparable companion in my thoughts?--"YOU ARE IN TEARS, AMELIA?"--Ha! let me fly from him!--fly!--never more shall my eyes behold this stranger!

[CHARLES opens the garden gate.

AMELIA (starting). Hark! hark! did I not hear the gate creak? (She perceives CHARLES, and starts up.) He?-- whither?--what?--I am rooted to the spot,--I cannot fly!--

____________________
*

Here, in the acting edition, is added, "Assuredly, if the spirits of the departed wander among the living, then must this stranger be Charles's angel."

-91-

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